How to place an existing Xcode project under Version Control with Git (and ignore files you don’t want to track)

Usually when you create a new Xcode Project you can choose to setup a new Git repository. This is the best and easiest way to track your changes. However if you have a project that is not under version control you can create a Git repository retrospectively.

This is fairly straightforward using the Terminal app on your Mac (under Applications / Utilities):

  • cd into the directory where your project resides
  • then initialize an empty repository (git init)
  • and add the entire directory to it (git add .)
  • commit your changes (git commit -m “initial commit)

So far so good. However Mac has a hidden directory called .DS_Store in every directory – we may not want to track that. Plus, every time you make a minor UI change in Xcode (such as open a group in the file explorer or something that is not relevant to your actual code) Xcode tracks this change in a file called UserInterfaceState.xcuserstate, and we definitely do NOT want to track that.

To tell Git that we don’t want those two things, we’ll amend our previous instructions a bit:

  • cd into the directory where you project resides
  • create a file called .gitignore
  • add each file or directory on a new line
  • then create, add and commit your files to Git

Let’s assume my project is called MyProject, then the steps are as follows:

If you have already committed all your files and forgot to setup the .gitignore file you must manually remove the files/directories you don’t want from being tracked. This is how you’d do that:

Replace myusername with your own system user name obviously, and MyProject with the actual folder in which your project resides.

About Jay Versluis

Jay is a medical miracle known as a Super Survivor. He runs two YouTube channels, five websites and several podcast feeds. To see what else he's up to, and to support him on his mission to make the world a better place, check out his Patreon Campaign.

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