All posts by Jay Versluis

About Jay Versluis

Jay is a medical miracle known as a Super Survivor. He runs two YouTube channels, five websites and several podcast feeds. To see what else he's up to, and to support him on his mission to make the world a better place, check out his Patreon Campaign.

How to tell Twitch which game you’re streaming

I was wondering how Twitch.tv knew which game people were streaming. I had seen such an option in YouTube, and when I broadcast something from my PS4 console the game gets set automatically – but when I use OBS, I’m in total control of the meta data.

Would Twitch figure this out automatically? That would be quite a feat of engineering indeed… and of course, that’s not how it work. Twitch has no idea what data I’ll be streaming. We’ll have to tell it manually.

Apparently there once was an option to set the game in a field called “playing”. However, no matter how hard I’ve tried to look for it (in 2019), that option doesn’t seem to exist any more.

Turns out it’s now called the Category field, and here’s how to set it:

  • head over to your Twitch Dashboard
  • that too has changed recently; if you can’t find it, login at Twitch.tv, then click on your Icon at the top right

  • under the Live option, you’ll be able to set your Stream Title, Category, Tags and Language
  • start typing your game title into the Category Field and see it start populating itself
  • pick your game from the list and you’re good to go

That’s how to do it!

PS: You can That’s how to do it!

PS: You can update this information while you’re live, so if you decide to switch to a different game halfway through your stream, that’s where to do it. Twitch will create a new chapter mark when you do this in your live stream. I guess it makes it easy for viewers to jump to the start of a new game in an otherwise uninterrupted stream.

The Category can also be changed for existing videos in your library: if you need to update the information in any of those, head over to the Video Producer (from your Icon at the top right). Choose the video in question, and on the right hand side, click on that three dots icon and choose Edit.

That’s where you can change the thumbnail, update the description and change the Category.

How to use your Windows Laptop as a second display

Windows 10 is full of surprises – one of which is its built-in capability to extend a monitor onto a second Windows device via WiFi. It’s called Windows Screen Projection I believe, a technology that also allows us to use remote displays like projectors without using any wires.

It’s basically like Apple’s AirPlay technology, or Avatron’s Air-Display, which works from Windows or macOS to an iOS device, or Duet Display, which works with a wired connection to an iOS device – except that it’s built right into Windows 10.

Here’s how to set it up.

Continue reading How to use your Windows Laptop as a second display

How to install the British Spell Checker in Firefox

I admit my language needs are a little bit less “normal” than those of most people:

I live in the US, I write things in English most of my time, but I’m used to writing with British spelling and grammar – and occasionally I write in German too. So that makes managing languages on the myriad of devices I’m using sightly tricky.

In this article I’ll show you how to change your language settings in Firefox.

Continue reading How to install the British Spell Checker in Firefox

How to create a screenshot on Windows (shortcut)

I’m primarily a Mac user and find the convenience of the CMD + SHIFT + 4 shortcut an invaluable tool to write documentation. Sometimes I do need to write on my Windows system though, and my mind simply keeps forgetting how to create convenient shortcuts there with the same convenience. I usually end up searching for the Snipping Tool, followed by getting frustrated with it.

Before I forget again, here’s how to take a screenshot on Windows using a shortcut (or in true Windows fashion, several shortcuts).

WIN + SHIFT + S (Partial Screenshot)

The Windows + SHIFT + S shortcut will grey out the screen and lets you draw a rectangle of whatever you’d like to capture. The resulting screenshot is copied to memory. Hit Edit – Paste or CTRL + V to paste it into other documents.

PrntScn Key (Full Screenshot)

Every Windows keyboard has a PrintScreen key hidden somwhere. It’s often labelled PrntScn or something similar, either accessible on its own or via a Functions Key. Hunt for it somewhere near the number block on the right hand side of your keyboard. Pressing that key will take a screenshot of the full display and copy it into memory.

ALT + PrntScn (Active Window Screenshot)

A variation on the above full-screen capture is the addition of the ALT key. When pressed together with the suprious PrntScn key, Windows will capture the currently active window and copy it into memory, complete with status bar (but without those slightly annoying shadows around it).

Thanks to HowToGeek for these tips. PS: That link contains about 147 other suggestions on how to take screenshots on Windows.

Handy Tip for WordPress Users

When you paste a screenshot with any of the above options into WordPress, the system is clever enough to upload the file to your server in the background. Now that’s handy!

Creating a Podcast Feed with WordPress and PowerPress – Part 3

In this final episode of this mini series I’ll show you how to configure the first episode of your Podcast Feed by adding the audio file to the post. I’m also talking about the implications of setting the date and time on the post so that all your post-dated episodes appear in the correct order. Finally, we’ll submit our validated feed to the Apple Podcasts directory.

Catch this episode on my WP Guru Podcast:

Plans for 2019 (and a Happy New Year)

I’ve been thinking about this for a while, and in 2019 I want to make it a reality: Regular Live Streams!

My idea is to do two types of streams:

Creative live streams, much like what I’ve been doing as fully proudced videos on a regular schedule. I’m thinking perhaps FRIDAYS at 10AM EST (that’s 4PM in the UK, 5PM in Europe and 2AM in Sydney) – let me know what you think. These will cover creative softwares like DAZ Studio, Photoshop, Marvelous Designer, Blender, Carrara, along those lines. Those solitary computer tasks, with the benefit of live interaction through chat.

The other type of stream is video gaming. Those are happening in addition, no regular schedule, and they’re more about hanging out and having a chat. It’s a great place to ask questions and get answers from me. At the same time, we’ll have a look at a video game and think about how it was built by the developers (as well as seeing how to play it).

I’m elaborating more about this idea on my other channel in Plans for Live Streaming.

See you soon 🙂

PS: Have a wonderful 2019 everybody!!!

Catch this episode on my WP Guru Podcast:

Creating a Podcast Feed with WordPress and PowerPress – Part 2

In this episode I’ll show you how to configure our Podcast Category with the relevant settings that are necessary for the feed to have meaningful content. I’ll talk about every single tab, including the Feed Description, specific Apple iTunes and Google Settings, how to add artwork and how to preview the feed.

Catch this episode on my WP Guru Podcast:

How to split a ZIP file into multiple parts on macOS and Linux

ZIP files can get quite large, depending on the amount of data we’re ZIPping up there. Having one huge file may not always be desirable, for example when making hard copies onto disk or tape media, or when upload limitations force the use of smaller files.

Thankfully, the clever little ZIP utility has a handy function that can split our archive into smaller chunks for later re-assembly. Here’s how it works:

This will create an archive of all files and subfolders in myfiles, creating a new file every 200MiB (about 10% more than 200MB). We can use K, G and T respectively (for KiB, GiB and TiB, all of which are 10% more than kilobyte, gigabyte and terabyte).

To clarify, the s switch will specify the size of each file, while the -r switch tells ZIP to do this operation recursively.

As a result, we’ll see a list of files like this:

To extract any or all of our files again, we can use the UNZIP utility. All we need to do now is to treat archive.zip as our main file and let UNZIP handle the rest. It will understand that all z** files are part of the multivolume archive. For example:

will list all files contained in our archive, not matter which files they’re physically contained in.

Should any of the volume files be missing or damaged, none of the archive can be read as far as I know. Make sure you leave them all in place and don’t try to open them by itself.

How to remove files from ZIP Archives in macOS and Linux

When ZIP up directories, particularly on macOS, some files may find their way into our ZIP archives that were never meant to be there. I’m thinking of those pesky .DS_Store and __MACOSX files, maybe even .htaccess files. For *nix based systems, * really means “everything”.

The ZIP command line tool let us remove such unwanted files from an existing archive. Here’s how:

The -d switch tells ZIP to hunt for and delete the unwanted files. Files whose names contain spaces can be defined in “regular quotes”, and the * asterisk can be used as usual.

For example, to remove all DS_Store files and __MACOSX files, we can use this:

To verify that such idiosyncrasies have indeed been removed from a ZIP archive before we release it into the wide, we can check with the UNZIP utility:

This will simply list the contents of your-archive.zip without actually extracting it.