Monthly Archives: April 2012

How to bring back Post Categories in P2

We’re all excited about the new features in Automattic’s P2 Theme v1.4.0 – however many of us have setup custom tweaks around Post Categories. In the latest version these have been replaced with Post Formats.

Post Formats are great, but they are limited to values defined in the WordPress core. If you wanted to create a new post menu like “critical” or “alarm” this wouldn’t work. We could use Custom Post Types to add to those formats, however it’s way too big an operation for I wanted to achieve: which is bringing back the “posting into categories” feature we’ve come to love from the previous version.

In this article I’ll show you how to back-port categories so posts will appear as they did in P2 v1.3.3 while retaining all functions of the latest update.

Continue reading How to bring back Post Categories in P2

P2 Theme gets an upgrade: say hello to Custom Menus and To-Do List Support

Today P2 Version 1.4.0 has been released – hurra! Thanks for everyone’s hard work on this amazing theme.

P2 now boasts a couple of extra options and plenty of changes under the hood, but like many other great features those are not immediately obvious. Let me show you how the new changes work and how they can make your P2 experience even better.

Continue reading P2 Theme gets an upgrade: say hello to Custom Menus and To-Do List Support

How to show your Linux Version

Sometimes you’re working on a system and you’re not entirely sure which Linux distribution it is. There are several ways to find out what you’re working with and I keep forgetting what they commands are to get there – so here’s a quick list for all of us.

Release and Distribution

Most systems (but not all) have a file called something-release in the /etc directory. On CentOS and Redhat this is /etc/redhat-release. Display the contents of that file and you’ll find out:

This is not going to work on an Ubuntu system for example where the file is called something different. The best approach hence is to call

which will give you the output no matter which distribution you’re on. You may also try

lsb_release -a

however this does not work on all systems. When it does it will typically show you a more detailed output.

Linux Kernel

If you want to dig even deeper and find out which Kernel you’re using, or if you’re working on a 32/64 bit system, try issuing

which will show you those. Try -a instead for a more detailed output.

Hubert is running CentOS 5.8 in 64bit. Looks like he needs an upgrade.

Hope this helps 😉