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  • Jay Versluis 12:42 pm on July 27, 2015 Permalink | Reply  
    Categories: Screencast ( 87 ), WordPress ( 145 )   

    WordPress Screencast, Part 1: Themes 

    In this video I’ll show what themes are and how to use them in WordPress (downloading, installing, activating and deleting). I’ll also show you how to preview themes before putting them live.

    Themes are what WordPress uses to style the look and feel of the front page. Depending on what theme you use, options in the back end may vary because some themes provide additional functionality (much like plugins). In this course I’m using TwentyThirteen.

     

    The full course is aimed at beginners and medium casuals alike. Whether you’ve been away from WordPress for a while, or if you’re a complete newbie, this is a very un-intimidating “getting started” guide.

    I’ll release one episode every week on my iTunes Podcast Feed, or you can watch the full course on one convenient YouTube Playlist.

    Enjoy!





     
  • Jay Versluis 4:35 pm on July 24, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Categories: Linux ( 101 )   

    How to install Parallels Tools via the Command Line in CentOS 

    I like setting up barebones CentOS and other flavoured VMs on my Mac via Parallels Desktop. Trouble is, for such things like time synchronisation to work properly, something called Parallels Tools needs to be installed on each VM.

    This is to make sure Parallels Desktop can speak to the VM and communicate with it properly. It’s more important for GUIs so that the screen resolution and mouse handling is more accurate.

    Thing is, when you have a VM with a GUI, installing Parallels Tolls is extremely easy and may even happen automatically as soon as you install the OS. But if you have a command line only interface, it just doesn’t happen, and it’s up to us to install those tools manually. Here’s how to do it in CentOS 6.

    First, boot up your barebones VM and wait for it to start. Now head over to the VM’s menu and choose Actions – Install Parallels Tools. If they’re already installed, this message will change to “Reinstall Parallels Tools”.

    Screen_Shot_2015-07-21_at_16_39_13

    If your VM has a graphical user interface, this process will kick off the actual installation, but on barebones machines, it will merely attach the ISO image that contains the tools to your VM. In an ideal world, this tool would even mount the image for us, but sadly it doesn’t work with CentOS. Therefore we have a bit more work to do until we get to the installation part.

    You’ll see the following message to confirm the attachment:

    Screen-Shot-2015-07-21-at-16.29.35

    Now let’s login to our VM as root using our favourite SSH client (or simply use Parallels Desktop). We’ll create a directory to which we can mount the image. As suggested in the Parallels documentation, we’ll use /media/cdrom:

    mkdir /media/cdrom

    With this directory in place, let’s mount the ISO image to it so we can address it:

    mount -o exec /dev/cdrom /media/cdrom
    mount: block device /dev/sr0 is write-protected, mounting read-only

    The message is fairly self-explanatory: no writing to that ISO image. No problem! To start the installation, enter the directory and call the install script like so:

    cd /media/cdrom
    ./install

     

    Help! That’ didn’t work!

    Sometimes (in CentOS 7 for example) the ISO image isn’t properly mounted, and instead Parallels Desktop mounts a directory containing the ISO image. That’s no good of course. If you receive an error message along the lines of “command not found”, take a look at the CD Rom’s directory with the ls command.

    If there is no file called “install”, and instead there’s something like “prl-tools-lin.iso”, you need to manually attach the ISO image to your VM. To do this, restart your VM and select Devices – CD/DVD 1 – Connect Image. Now navigate to Applications – Parallels Desktop.app – Contents – Resources – Tools and pick the appropriate ISO file.

    Screen Shot 2015-08-07 at 12.49.50

     

    For all Linux flavours this is prl-tools-lin.iso. Once attached, mount the device as discussed above and you should be able to run the installer.

     

    Parallels Tools TUI in action

    The script will greet us with a TUI and some steps we need to complete, one of which may be that some additional components (such as make and gcc) need to be installed. That’s not always the case on barebones systems. Lucky for us, the script will take care of this for us too:

    Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 16.33.51

    And that’s it! The script will finish fairly quickly, and at that point, Parallels Tools is installed in your VM. Congratulations! There’s only one final step: reboot the VM. You can either do that from the VM’s menu under Actions – Restart, or by issuing the following command:

    reboot now
    
    Broadcast message from root@yourserver
    (/dev/pts/0) at 16:53 ...
    
    The system is going down for reboot NOW!

    As soon as the VM is back up and running you’re all set 🙂

    Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 16.38.48

     

    Further Reading:





     
  • Jay Versluis 9:39 am on July 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply  
    Categories: Screencast ( 87 ), WordPress ( 145 )   

    WordPress Screencast, Part 0: Introduction and Workflow 

    I thought it’s about time that I update my old WordPress course, and here’s the first instalment. I’ll talk you through WordPress 4.2. This part focusses on general workflow, how to log in, how WordPress works and how to use the integrated help system. I will also cover software updates for WordPress, Themes and Plugins.

    The full course is aimed at beginners and medium casuals alike. Whether you’ve been away from WordPress for a while, or if you’re a complete newbie, this is a very un-intimidating “getting started” guide.

    I’ll release one episode every week on my iTunes Podcast Feed, or you can watch the full course on one convenient YouTube Playlist.

    Enjoy!





     
  • Jay Versluis 4:28 pm on July 17, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Categories: Plesk ( 76 )   

    How to enable resuming FTP uploads in Plesk 

    Plesk uses ProFTP as the default FTP server. It has a handy feature that allows file uploads to resume or append should a connection be broken during transmission. This means that partially transferred data doesn’t have to be uploaded again, it can simply be added to – potentially saving a lot of time.

    Although easy to activate, this feature is not enabled by default on Plesk installations for security reasons. Here’s how to make it happen:

    Edit /etc/proftpd.conf and add the following few lines:

    # allow resuming file uploads
    AllowStoreRestart on
    AllowOverwrite on
    

    You may find the AllowOverwrite directive in there already, in which case replace it with the above block. For the changes to take effect, restart the xinetd service (of which proFTP is part):

    service xinetd restart
    

    Works on both CentOS 6 and CentOS 7.

    Note that for this to work, it also needs to be enabled in your FTP client. In FileZilla it’s under Settings – Transfers – File Exists Action:

    Screen-Shot-2015-04-09-at-12.40.26





     
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