Category Archives: Windows

How to transfer files from your GoPro to your computer via WiFi

There is an iOS and Android App available to transfer files directly from a GoPro camera to a mobile device. Those apps transcode files and compress them for easier viewing, and to save storage space.

While that approach gets footage onto my iPhone, I still need to transfer the files to my Mac for editing. Plus, there’s an additional compression step involved which can’t be good for picture quality. Besides, it takes forever to do its job.

A much more useful approach would be to hook directly into the GoPro and transfer files that way. This leaves the SD card place and doesn’t disturb the (sometimes hard to reach or difficult to recreate) position of the camera.

Here’s how to do it.

Continue reading How to transfer files from your GoPro to your computer via WiFi

Thoughts on Windows 10 Upgrade Error 0xc190020e

My first generation Surface Pro only has 64GB of space, roughly 20 of which I’m allowed to use (the rest of it is kind of forever “lost in cyberspace” – or so it seems). It’s been running all Windows 10 updates fine until a few months ago, when Windows kept bugging me that the latest security patches needed to be installed.

I was happily running Version 1703 up to that point and never had an issue with space limitations or deferring updates. Until early 2018, when Microsoft started  aggressively forcing the Fall Creator’s Update down my throat.  Continue reading Thoughts on Windows 10 Upgrade Error 0xc190020e

How to shutdown Windows 10 without applying updates

Although most of Windows 10 keeps getting better with every iteration, some things just never change. Windows Updates are one of those. They always want to download and install when we really don’t have the time or the battery power.

What’s worst, Microsoft have removed the graphical option to simply shutdown the system – and all we’re left with are two choices: “Update and shutdown”, or “Update and restart”.

What if all we want to do is to shutdown or restart WITHOUT applying those updates? Perhaps we’re out and about, running on an already near-depleted battery? Or we’re in a hurry and would like to leave the update for when we have more time, or a power outlet?

Fear not, there is a way to do these things – even if they don’t come up in the Start menu anymore.

Continue reading How to shutdown Windows 10 without applying updates

Format a Linux system drive on Windows

The other day I tried to format a USB drive for use with Windows. I had previously tried this on my Mac to no avail. But now even Windows was telling me that it too could not format my drive.

I was stumped! I had in fact never seen anything like it before. Was that USB drive broken? Had I turned stupid overnight? Well perhaps… but more importantly, it dawned on me what I had used this USB drive prior to this formatting nightmare: it was a Linux installation that could run directly from the stick.

This is important, because as part of the installation, a protected EFI system partition is installed. This is used for booting if I understand correctly, and hence rather important. So important in fact that the ordinary user tools in both macOS and Windows do not allow us users (even Administrators) to erase such partitions.

Lucky for us, the friendly folks at WinAbility have provided a detailed guide on how to remove such a protected partition on Windows. Enjoy the article!

  • http://www.winability.com/delete-protected-efi-disk-partition/

What’s the difference between the Logitech M325 and the M325c

The Logitech M325 and M325c are both wireless USB mice. Their design appears to be identical (except for the many different colourful variations of course), and their prices vary from anything between $12 and $60 – depending the layout and seller. Even the packaging is identical.

So what’s the difference between these two models? Is it precision? Is it the build quality? Is it the year of production? Is it something else?

Actually no, the two mice are absolutely identical and both work with Windows, macOS and Linux. The only difference is in the wireless receiver that Logitech give you with each model.

The difference is the wireless receiver

The M325 comes with a Logitech Unifying Receiver. You can tell by the little “sunshine” logo on the side. This type of receiver allows us to use the Logitech Unifying Software to operate several devices over a single receiver (say a mouse and a keyboard). It’s a little clunky to setup more than one device, but it certainly saves valuable USB slots on your machine.

Note that for this to work, all decides must be Logitech unifying devices, and all must display that little sunshine logo.

The M325c on the other hand does NOT come with a unifying receiver, and instead comes with a standard USB receiver. Only this one device will work with said receiver. As you can imagine, the receiver does not bear the unifying logo on the side. Therefore you may find the M325c a little cheaper than the M325.

Note however that the M325c mouse itself IS a unifying device, and it DOES bear the unifying logo on the underside. Hence you can use the M325c mouse with another unifying receiver just fine.

So there you have it – that’s the big secret difference between these two mice. I have both, and I couldn’t tell the difference at first. The mice are identical, just the USB receiver is a little different. Just in case this question was driving you crazy too 🙂

How to check which web server is running on a domain

Sometimes we must know what web server is running on a particular domain. Usually web hosts should be able to tell a client this, but if the client is afraid to ask, there is a way to ask the web server directly for this information.

Just to clarify: the web server is the process that serves files (HTML, PHP, ASP, images, etc) from a remote machine to your local web browser. The most likely choices in this day and age (2017) are Apache, NGINX or IIS. The latter is used by Windows servers, and the two former are used by Linux servers. There are other web servers too, such as lighttpd, but they’re used less commonly.

By asking the web server for this information, we can tell exactly who’s serving those files.

How to ask the Web Server

Let’s open a Terminal or Command Line Prompt window and utilise the good old fashioned Telnet protocol. Replace yourserver.com with the actual domain in question: Continue reading How to check which web server is running on a domain

How to fix “connected to WiFi, but can’t see the Internet” on Windows 10

For the last few days I had a very interesting (read: ultra annoying) issue with Windows 10 on my Surface Pro. No matter which network I was connecting to, I could never see the internet anymore.

Logic dictates that there was perhaps an issue with the router, but since it happened on other networks as well, this couldn’t have been the case. I could even ping the router, but no matter what else I tried, Windows didn’t see the internet.

Finally I came across this Microsoft Support Article that suggested several things, among whose suggestions were to reset the TCP/IP stack and to renew the IP address. Sounds like fun I thought and went to work.

Here’s how I could solve my internet issues:

Continue reading How to fix “connected to WiFi, but can’t see the Internet” on Windows 10

How to fix problems with Logitech Unifying Receivers

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-17-12-10I’ve recently bought a new Logitech K360 keyboard for my HP Z600 workstation. I also had a Logitech M325 mouse, both of which came with Unifying USB receivers. I could plug both receivers in, and both devices would work great.

However, I heard good things about these little receivers and wanted to free up a USB port, and thought I’d connect both devices to the same receiver. Apparently you can connect up to 6 devices to one receiver and store any spare ones inside the mouse or keyboard. Being an all-efficient belt-and-braces kinda guy, I tried my luck.

Turns out it was relatively easy to pair both devices to the same receiver, thanks to a small piece of software that can be found here, along with instructions on how to use it:

It all worked fine on my Windows 10 machine, until I wanted to use the mouse (not the keyboard) with my Mac. I know, it’s exotic, and perhaps I should have just bought another mouse. But there’s only so much space on my desk, and I really don’t need more clutter in front of me for just an occasional switch.

I regretted pairing both devices to the same receiver and wished I hadn’t done that, for this very eventuality. So now I had to figure out how to UN-pair both devices again and put them back to how things used to be (before I started messing with them). Continue reading How to fix problems with Logitech Unifying Receivers

How to setup Plesk Mail in Mozilla Thunderbird for Windows

In this episode I’ll show you how to setup Plesk Mail in Thunderbird for Windows. Unlike most email clients, Thunderbird can figure out the correct settings by itself – something neither Outlook nor Mac Mail can do. Therefore, the real magic with Thunderbird is figuring out how to get to the account settings.

To do so, click the three little lines next to the search box. It will bring up a fly-out menu. Under Options – Account Settings, setup a new account or change the settings for an existing one.

TB-Demo

Thunderbird is clever usually enough to detect the settings it needs to connect to the Plesk server. In case it fails, use the following:

  • STARTTLS as encryption
  • Authentication: use encrypted password
  • your full email address as user name (such as you@domain.com)
  • Port 143
  • Outgoing Mail Server: Port 587
  • Incoming Mail Server: Port 143 OR 993

Good luck!

Catch this episode on my WP Guru Podcast: