Category Archives: Windows

Where is Stream Deck profile data saved

I wanted to move my Stream Deck Profile Data over to another machine. I had previously setup several shortcuts and actions and wanted to sue the same setup on another system.

Turns out Elgato’s Stream Deck software saves such data in a similar location as OBS Studio does. Here’s the full path:

Windows

On Windows 10, you’ll find those files in the following location. For this example, imagine your user name is “you” and replace it with your correct one.

  • C:\Users\you\AppData\Roaming\Elgato\StreamDeck

macOS

On macOS, you’ll find those files in the following location:

  • ~/Library/Application Support/Elgato/StreamDeck

The Tilde Symbol means “your home folder”. If my user name was “you”, then the full path to the OBS Settings would be

  • /Users/you/Library/Application Support/Elgato/StreamDeck

Note that for either profile to work on another system, make sure all applications and their respective settings are also replicated. For example, if you’re switching OBS Studio scenes with your Stream Deck, both OBS Studio and the scenes/collections need to be configured the same was as before.

Windows does not recognise new CPU – SOLVED!

I acquired a new HP Z600 Workstation from eBay recently. I was thrilled to get a unit in such condition for such a good price. It was equipped with a single (and relatively slow) E5605 Xeon processor, but the motherboard supports two Xeons by default. So I bought a pair of faster hexacore X5675 Xeons and made my new Z600 even better.

Before I did so, I decided to install Windows 10 to see if the unit was working as expected – which thankfully it did. After Windows had updated itself several times, I decided to replace the CPUs and check if the BIOS was happy with the new processors. It was, showing them correctly before Windows booted.

However, after Windows had loaded, all I saw in the Device Manager was a single CPU, namely the slower E5605. What was going on? Why was Windows not recognising the new dual-CPU setup that I clearly had?

Turns out this can happen sometimes when a CPU is replaced with a very similar model. In essence, to Windows it looks the same, and the correct procedure for updating the hardware is not triggered. Thankfully there is a manual way to do this:

  • in Device Manager, head over to Processors
  • select each logical processor (the “old and incorrect” one in the list)
  • hit delete to remove each and every one
  • restart Windows

When Windows loads, it will see that it should have some processors installed, and will call the correct update procedure – usually resulting in the correct CPU detection. This is actually a tip from the Microsoft Support Website, but it does not specifically give these instructions for Windows 10.

Turns out that Windows 10 will also detect the new CPU(s) correctly when a major update is being installed. In my case, before I had a chance to delete the processors, Windows had updated from the 1607 to the 1803 build.

How to connect from your Mac to your Windows 10 Computer

Networking sucks, particularly when Windows is involved. I’m not actually sure why, but I guess it has to do with the fact that deep down, manufacturers and software developer really don’t want us to connect arbitrary devices to suit our needs. It’s just a fact of technological survival I guess.

I’ve recently re-installed Windows on my desktop, and now my Mac cannot connect to Windows anymore. I had to set this up again from scratch. While I remember how to do it, here’s how it (once) worked for me:

Continue reading How to connect from your Mac to your Windows 10 Computer

Using Multiple Desktops in Windows 10

Ever since I’ve discovered how useful Spaces are on my Mac, I’ve been wanting a similar functionality in Windows. I’ve come across this feature in KDE and Gnome on Linux, but not in Windows.

Until yesterday evening, when I wanted to switch between applications that were stacked on top of one another, using the familiar ALT + TAB shortcut. By where accident I’ve pressed WINDOWS + TAB, and imagine my surprise when I found this:

This super exciting feature is actually a new addition to the Windows 10 Fall Creator Update if I remember correctly, called the Task View. It’s the same view that opens when we click that little icon to the left of the Cortana Search bar in the Task Bar.

Besides a history if everything we’ve been doing, we get to create new independent Desktop environments at the top. This allows us to launch different apps on different Desktops, instantly decluttering our already all too crowded workflow. For example, have a browser open in one Desktop, and a full screen app in another, without having to stack them on top of each other, or using separate monitors. Your neck will be forever grateful.

I find this functionality particularly useful for streaming purposes: to switch scenes live in OBS, I really need a second monitor… but my desk is too small for that. By operating OBS on an independent Desktop, I can quickly switch over there and do what I need to do, without interrupting whatever is happening on my main Desktop that’s going live to air

Here’s Microsoft’s Support Article about Multiple Desktops.

Enjoy Mac Spaces – now available in Windows 🙂

How to swap displays with a Shortcut in Windows 10

On my Windows 10 system, I frequently connect other monitors and display devices to my various graphic card outputs. This often happens “ad hoc” and only temporarily, and because my configurations seem to vary by situation, Windows inevitably chooses an option that’s not right for me.

One example is that I plug a monitor in that’s switched off, with the intention of duplicating the displays, and all I see now is a “blank screen”, because Windows thinks the “switched off” monitor is probably my main one. As a result, I can’t see anything or change the display settings to what I’d like to do. Right clicking on the desktop brings up the Display Settings dialogue, but of course that shows up on the wrong desktop. Sigh!

The solution would be a keyboard shortcut with which I could toggle how Windows uses this second display: duplicate, extend, replace and switch off, that sort of thing.

And guess what? That keyboard shortcut actually exists! Drumroll please: it’s…

Windows + P

Pressing the Windows Key and the P key together switches modes, just like the ones we get when we use the Project option from the Task Bar (on the right). The options are

  • PC Screen Only
  • Duplicate
  • Extend
  • Second Screen Only

Make sure you wait a few seconds between each key press so your displays and GPU have a moment to react accordingly. Eventually, a display configuration you can at least work with (like Duplicate) will appear that lets you adjust your Display Settings more appropriately (either from the Cortana Search Box or a right-click on your empty desktop).

This shortcut works intuitively well with two displays… but when you have THREE attached to a system, it can get hairy. Either way, happy Display Swapping 🙂

How to use your Windows Laptop as a second display

Windows 10 is full of surprises – one of which is its built-in capability to extend a monitor onto a second Windows device via WiFi. It’s called Windows Screen Projection I believe, a technology that also allows us to use remote displays like projectors without using any wires.

It’s basically like Apple’s AirPlay technology, or Avatron’s Air-Display, which works from Windows or macOS to an iOS device, or Duet Display, which works with a wired connection to an iOS device – except that it’s built right into Windows 10.

Here’s how to set it up.

Continue reading How to use your Windows Laptop as a second display

How to create a screenshot on Windows (shortcut)

I’m primarily a Mac user and find the convenience of the CMD + SHIFT + 4 shortcut an invaluable tool to write documentation. Sometimes I do need to write on my Windows system though, and my mind simply keeps forgetting how to create convenient shortcuts there with the same convenience. I usually end up searching for the Snipping Tool, followed by getting frustrated with it.

Before I forget again, here’s how to take a screenshot on Windows using a shortcut (or in true Windows fashion, several shortcuts).

WIN + SHIFT + S (Partial Screenshot)

The Windows + SHIFT + S shortcut will grey out the screen and lets you draw a rectangle of whatever you’d like to capture. The resulting screenshot is copied to memory. Hit Edit – Paste or CTRL + V to paste it into other documents.

PrntScn Key (Full Screenshot)

Every Windows keyboard has a PrintScreen key hidden somwhere. It’s often labelled PrntScn or something similar, either accessible on its own or via a Functions Key. Hunt for it somewhere near the number block on the right hand side of your keyboard. Pressing that key will take a screenshot of the full display and copy it into memory.

ALT + PrntScn (Active Window Screenshot)

A variation on the above full-screen capture is the addition of the ALT key. When pressed together with the suprious PrntScn key, Windows will capture the currently active window and copy it into memory, complete with status bar (but without those slightly annoying shadows around it).

Thanks to HowToGeek for these tips. PS: That link contains about 147 other suggestions on how to take screenshots on Windows.

Handy Tip for WordPress Users

When you paste a screenshot with any of the above options into WordPress, the system is clever enough to upload the file to your server in the background. Now that’s handy!

How to transfer files from your GoPro to your computer via WiFi

There is an iOS and Android App available to transfer files directly from a GoPro camera to a mobile device. Those apps transcode files and compress them for easier viewing, and to save storage space.

While that approach gets footage onto my iPhone, I still need to transfer the files to my Mac for editing. Plus, there’s an additional compression step involved which can’t be good for picture quality. Besides, it takes forever to do its job.

A much more useful approach would be to hook directly into the GoPro and transfer files that way. This leaves the SD card place and doesn’t disturb the (sometimes hard to reach or difficult to recreate) position of the camera.

Here’s how to do it.

Continue reading How to transfer files from your GoPro to your computer via WiFi

Thoughts on Windows 10 Upgrade Error 0xc190020e

My first generation Surface Pro only has 64GB of space, roughly 20 of which I’m allowed to use (the rest of it is kind of forever “lost in cyberspace” – or so it seems). It’s been running all Windows 10 updates fine until a few months ago, when Windows kept bugging me that the latest security patches needed to be installed.

I was happily running Version 1703 up to that point and never had an issue with space limitations or deferring updates. Until early 2018, when Microsoft started  aggressively forcing the Fall Creator’s Update down my throat.  Continue reading Thoughts on Windows 10 Upgrade Error 0xc190020e

How to shutdown Windows 10 without applying updates

Although most of Windows 10 keeps getting better with every iteration, some things just never change. Windows Updates are one of those. They always want to download and install when we really don’t have the time or the battery power.

What’s worst, Microsoft have removed the graphical option to simply shutdown the system – and all we’re left with are two choices: “Update and shutdown”, or “Update and restart”.

What if all we want to do is to shutdown or restart WITHOUT applying those updates? Perhaps we’re out and about, running on an already near-depleted battery? Or we’re in a hurry and would like to leave the update for when we have more time, or a power outlet?

Fear not, there is a way to do these things – even if they don’t come up in the Start menu anymore.

Continue reading How to shutdown Windows 10 without applying updates