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Over 80% is running on some form of Linux – so does your Mac and you iPhone. Sometimes we have to get our hands dirty on the command line – it makes you feel like a proper hacker.

Here are some pointers I picked up on my journey.

  • Jay Versluis 3:26 pm on April 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Commodore, Linux, Mac OS X, Screencast ( 38 )

    How to run Commodore BASIC as a Scripting Language on macOS 

    Did you know you can run Commodore BASIC v2 on your Mac and Linux systems as a scripting language? It’s true – thanks to the marvellous efforts of Michael Steil and James Abbatiello. They’ve adapted the original BASIC v2 as featured on the VIC-20 and C64 with additional routines so that it works natively on modern machines. It’s ingenious!

    You can get the full source code on GitHub – it works a treat!

    For those who don’t quite know what to do with it, here are some instructions that’ll help you get CBM BASIC up and running on macOS.

    Download

    GitHub provides a convenient way to either clone a repository on your local machine if you have GitHub for Desktop installed, or you can download a ZIP file and unZIP it somewhere on your system. Once done, you should see a directory structure that looks exactly like the repo on GitHub.

    Compile

    You need a few utilities installed your your Mac to be able to compile files. Downloading Xcode will ptovide you with an excellent (and free) IDE as well as the command line tools needed to do that (gcc, make and several other goodies). You might be able to bring those components in using the Homebrew package manager.

    Using your Terminal app, navigate to your unZIPped folder. It includes a MAKEFILE so there’s no need to mess with any parameters. Enter “make” at the command prompt, and after a few moments you should have a file called “cbmbasic” without an extension in the same directory. That’s the binary for your Mac.

    To make it executable, we’ll have to tweak the file permissions – otherwise our operating system won’t be able to run it. We’ll do it using the chmod command:

    chmod +x ./cbmbasic

    You can test if it works by calling the binary without any parameters like this:

    ./cbmbasic

    If all goes well you should see something like this:

    For easy access, copy the binary over to your /usr/bin directory. That’s where common command line utilities are installed on Mac and Linux systems. The added benefit is that the path to that folder is already in your local $PATH variable, and as such you can simply type “cbmbasic” from any location when you’re on the command line.

    Here’s how to copy the binary over (this will ask for your administrator password):

    sudo cp ./cbmbasic /usr/bin

    Using Direct Mode

    When you run the binary it will bring up something like the standard BASIC command prompt we’re used to seeing on the Commodore 64. There are however a few important differences between a C64 emulator and this implementation:

    • this is NOT an emulator
    • cursor keys DO NOT work
    • all commands typed in must be CAPITALISED

    Other than that, you can start typing like on a real machine. Be careful with certain POKE commands though as those may call system routines that might not be implemented.

    LOAD and SAVE commands have been tweaked to reference the command line structure. They work just fine, but will load and save files in Commodore file format (which is not clear text ASCII – more on that later). For example:

    LOAD"$"
    
    LIST
    
    0 "/Users/versluis/Desktop/cbmbasic" 00 2A
    4    "."                PRG  
    2    ".."               PRG  
    2    ".git"             PRG  
    567  "cbmbasic"         PRG  
    7350 "cbmbasic.c"       PRG  
    593  "cbmbasic.o"       PRG  
    19   "cbmbasic.vcproj"  PRG  
    20   "console.c"        PRG  
    3    "console.h"        PRG  
    8    "console.o"        PRG  
    4    "glue.h"           PRG   
    1    "Makefile"         PRG  
    2    "Makefile.sun32"   PRG  
    3    "Makefile.win32"   PRG  
    27   "plugin.c"         PRG  
    
    ...
    
    READY.

    The above displays the directory of the current folder, much like it was an attached floppy drive. How cool is that? You can reference folders using both LOAD and SAVE just as if you were on the command line.

    You can also type in programmes and run them – however the cursor keys won’t work, so there’s no screen editing options. Programmes SAVEd from direct mode cannot be loaded from the command line, only from direct mode (i.e. when launching the binary without parameters).

    To quit direct mode, hit CTRL+C.

    Running Programmes from the Command Line

    The real power of this implementation can be seen when we run files from the command line. Those files must not be SAVEd from direct mode, but instead are simple clear text files. The extension doesn’t matter, but for good practice, let’s store them as .BAS files (much like shell scripts are stored with the.SH extension, or PHP files would be stored with the .PHP extension… you get the idea).

    You can write standard BASIC programmes use your favourite text editor (like vi from the command line), or try one from the “test” directory that’s provided with the repository.

    Imagine we had a file called “hello.bas” that we’ve created with vi, looking like this:

    10 PRINT "Hello World!"

    To run our file, we can simply define it behind the binary like this:

    cbmbasic hello.bas

    This will greet us with the “Hello World” message on the command line.

    Running Script Files

    Alternatively, we can specify the full path to cbmbasic at the beginning of a file (she-bang notation) and run it just like any other script file. Observe please:

    #!/usr/bin/cbmbasic
    10 PRINT “Hello World”
    20 PRINT “from CBM BASIC :-)”

    If the file was called “hello”, we’d need to change the permissions again so that the file can be executed:

    chmod +x ./hello

    Now we can run it like this:

     ./hello
    
    Hello World
    from CBM BASIC 🙂

    Sweet – but I can’t work out how to compile this on macOS…

    Fear not – I’ve got a macOS binary that was compiled on 10.12 “Sierra”. You can find it in my fork of the project. Check out the “binaries” folder.

    Does it work on Windows? Or on Linux?

    I’ve tested compiling and running this puppy on CentOS 6 and 7 with roaring success. The above steps worked fine for it, so I’m assuming it’ll work on other Linux flavours just as well (the beauty of portable C code).

    According to the author, it works fine on Windows too – however I have no idea how to compile source code on Windows, so you’ll have to figure that out for yourself. I hear good things about Visual Studio  – if I work out how to do it, I’ll add it to the “binaries” folder on my GitHub Fork.

    Can I write my own extensions to BASIC?

    Apparently so – check our Michael’s site and repo for details:

    Right now, if you run SYS 1 from direct mode first, you can use the SYSTEM command (followed by anything you’d like to execute on the command line in “double quotes”) as well as LOCATE (followed by an x and y coordinate to place the text cursor) and WAIT.

    Have fun hacking BASIC and letting it run with the blistering speed of modern CPUs 🙂





     
  • Jay Versluis 10:35 am on September 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Linux ( 97 )

    How to find out which version of GNOME you’re using 

    In the GNOME desktop, there is no obvious way to tell which version you’re running by way of the GUI. Instead, we need to consult the command line and try out a couple of commands to find out more. Here’s how.

    Let’s open a Terminal session and do some hacking.

    GNOME 2.x

    If you’re running GNOME 2.x (under CentOS 6 for example), you need to run the following command:

    gnome-session --version
    
    gnome-session 2.28.0

    You may need to prefix this command with sudo, otherwise it will tell you that you’re alrady running a GNOME session.

    Should the above not work, you’re likely on GNOME 3 (see next).

    GNOME 3.x

    GNOME 3 uses a different command, namely this one:

    gnome-panel --version
    
    gnome-panel 3.24.2

    If you don’t know which version of the GNOME panel you’re using (which is likely), try both commands. One of them will work, the other one won’t.





     
  • Jay Versluis 3:11 pm on June 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Command Line   

    Categories: Linux ( 97 )

    How to rename a batch of files in Linux 

    Bulk renaming files can be done with the rename command. It shares many similarities with cp and mv, but its simplicity can be so staggering that its difficult to figure out how to use it.

    If we just type “rename” at the command prompt, all we get is the message

    rename
    call: rename from to files...

    While technically correct, what on earth does it mean? How do we use rename?

    Let’s do a little exercise. Imagine we had a batch of files, perhaps something like “Title 101.mp4” to “Title 110.mp4”. Let’s create some empty files with those names in a test directory:

    mkdir test
    cd ./test
    touch 'Title '{101..110}.mp4
    ls

    So far so good. Now we’d like to rename those files so they read “New Title 101.mp4” to “New Title 110.mp4”. Here’s how it works:

    rename 'Title' 'New Title' *.mp4

    Technically, this follows what the command showed us earlier: “rename from to files…”. Still I feel a little explanation is in order.

    For the rename command to work, we don’t need to specify the full file name, nor that we want to rename a batch of files. The command will rename anything that it encounters. All it needs to know is which string to replace with which other string. Those are the first two parameters we give it, in our case wrapped in single quotes because we have a space character in our titles.

    The third parameter tells rename where the files live that we want to rename. In our example it was here in the current directory, but it could be anywhere on the system. By specifying *.mp4, only files with that ending will be renamed, all other files will be left in peace.

    I hope this helps to understand rename a little better.





     
  • Jay Versluis 12:01 pm on June 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Linux ( 97 )

    How to exit VI with or without saving 

    Although many alternatives exist, I like using vi for all my command line editing needs. To save changes, I usually use SHIFT + Z + Z, exiting vi under most circumstances.

    But sometimes, this trick doesn’t work because of write permission problems. In such cases, vi doesn’t close with the above command. Instead, we must either stash our changes in another file, or quit the session without saving. Here’s how to do that.

    Quit vi without saving:
    :q!

    Save current file under a different name:
    :w newfile





     
  • Jay Versluis 4:36 pm on June 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Linux ( 97 )

    How to read command line parameters in BASH Scripts 

    Shell Scripts (BASH Scripts) can access command line parameters using the the variables $1, $2, $2 and so forth, up to $9. In fact, more parameters can be accessed by using curly brackets, like ${10}, ${187} and so forth.

    Here’s an example:

    #!/bin/bash
    
    if [[ $1 == "x" ]]; then
      echo "Statement is true"
    else
      echo "Statement is false"
    fi
    

    If we run the script with like this

    script.sh x
    

    it will tell us the statement is true. Otherwise, it’ll tell us the opposite.

    Note the whitespace around the evaluation: [[ ]] is actually a command (much like the == operator) and therefore needs to be surrounded with whitespace.





     
  • Jay Versluis 3:10 pm on June 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Linux ( 97 )

    How to read command line parameters in PHP Shell Scripts 

    We can access parameters passed via the command line in our PHP shell scripts. Those are stored as an array in the variable $argv. Consider this:

    #!/usr/bin/php
    <?php
    
    echo var_dump($argv);
    echo "\n";
    
    if ($argv[1] == 'x') {
      echo "The parameter is x.";
    } else {
      echo "The parameter was something else.";
    }
    

    The first part of the script prints out all parameters that have been given, while the second part checks if the parameter was “x” or not. Note that the first item in the array ($argv[0]) will be the the first item on the command line, i.e. the file name and path to this very script. $argv[1] is the first parameter, $argv[2] the second, and so forth.

    We can call the script with

    script.php x
    

    to give it one parameter, or with

    script.php x y z
    

    to give it three parameters.





     
  • Jay Versluis 11:29 am on June 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: tar   

    Categories: Linux ( 97 )

    How to extract files from a bz2 archive in Linux 

    If you’ve ever tried to decompress a file that ends in tar.bz2 using the tar command with the standard -x option, you’ll have noticed that it doesn’t work. That’s because some versions of tar don’t understand the bzip2 codec used in these archives.

    However, you can tell tar to use this option by specifying the -j parameter, like so:

    tar -xjf yourfile.tar.bz2
    

    If this still doesn’t work, we can use the dedicated bzip2 command like so:

    bzip2 -d yourfile.tar.bz2
    

    The -d switch stands for “decompress”. Notice that this will extract all files and delete the original .bz2 file by default. Very convenient indeed! If you’d like to keep it, just pass the -k switch (for “keep”), like this:

    bzip2 -dk yourfile.tar.z2
    

    Checkout man bzip2 for more details, or pass the –help for as quick overview.





     
  • Jay Versluis 9:11 am on May 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Linux ( 97 )

    How to remove duplicate packages with yum 

    I’m working on a handful of servers that all have the same problem: when running yum, an error message appears that tells me a package called ntpupdate needs to be upgraded, but somehow this doesn’t work and the package is being skipped. Then follows a huge list of duplicate packages that are installed on those systems (probably installed by the automatic package updater within Plesk).

    Let’s see how we can fix such issues. (More …)





     
  • Jay Versluis 6:02 pm on April 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: EFI   

    Categories: Bookmarks, Linux, Windows ( 18 )

    Format a Linux system drive on Windows 

    The other day I tried to format a USB drive for use with Windows. I had previously tried this on my Mac to no avail. But now even Windows was telling me that it too could not format my drive.

    I was stumped! I had in fact never seen anything like it before. Was that USB drive broken? Had I turned stupid overnight? Well perhaps… but more importantly, it dawned on me what I had used this USB drive prior to this formatting nightmare: it was a Linux installation that could run directly from the stick.

    This is important, because as part of the installation, a protected EFI system partition is installed. This is used for booting if I understand correctly, and hence rather important. So important in fact that the ordinary user tools in both macOS and Windows do not allow us users (even Administrators) to erase such partitions.

    Lucky for us, the friendly folks at WinAbility have provided a detailed guide on how to remove such a protected partition on Windows. Enjoy the article!





     
  • Jay Versluis 4:54 pm on April 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Linux, Mac OS X, Windows ( 97 )

    What’s the difference between the Logitech M325 and the M325c 

    The Logitech M325 and M325c are both wireless USB mice. Their design appears to be identical (except for the many different colourful variations of course), and their prices vary from anything between $12 and $60 – depending the layout and seller. Even the packaging is identical.

    So what’s the difference between these two models? Is it precision? Is it the build quality? Is it the year of production? Is it something else?

    Actually no, the two mice are absolutely identical and both work with Windows, macOS and Linux. The only difference is in the wireless receiver that Logitech give you with each model.

    The difference is the wireless receiver

    The M325 comes with a Logitech Unifying Receiver. You can tell by the little “sunshine” logo on the side. This type of receiver allows us to use the Logitech Unifying Software to operate several devices over a single receiver (say a mouse and a keyboard). It’s a little clunky to setup more than one device, but it certainly saves valuable USB slots on your machine.

    Note that for this to work, all decides must be Logitech unifying devices, and all must display that little sunshine logo.

    The M325c on the other hand does NOT come with a unifying receiver, and instead comes with a standard USB receiver. Only this one device will work with said receiver. As you can imagine, the receiver does not bear the unifying logo on the side. Therefore you may find the M325c a little cheaper than the M325.

    Note however that the M325c mouse itself IS a unifying device, and it DOES bear the unifying logo on the underside. Hence you can use the M325c mouse with another unifying receiver just fine.

    So there you have it – that’s the big secret difference between these two mice. I have both, and I couldn’t tell the difference at first. The mice are identical, just the USB receiver is a little different. Just in case this question was driving you crazy too 🙂





     
    • me 6:32 pm on May 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      thank you for this simple and complete explanation

      • Jay Versluis 4:28 pm on May 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        You’re very welcome – it has been bugging me too 🙂

    • KY 11:50 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you so much. Your article helped clear up the difference.

    • zulker 9:56 pm on November 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks you so much for the details! It was bugging me so much and literally was making me nuts! 🙂

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