All posts by Jay Versluis

About Jay Versluis

Jay is a medical miracle known as a Super Survivor. He runs two YouTube channels, five websites and several podcast feeds. To see what else he's up to, and to support him on his mission to make the world a better place, check out his Patreon Campaign.

Pairing an Apple Keyboard with Windows 10

In this episode I’ll show you how to successfully pair an Apple Wireless Magic Keyboard (first generation, MC184B/A) with Windows 10 (Version 1809). I’ve found so much conflicting information on the web, so I’m showing you what worked for me – in May 2019.

I’m using a HP Z800 Workstation here, with a no-frills Belkin F8T013 (early millennial vintage).

Pairing two Logitech Devices with the same USB Receiver

In this episode I’ll show you how to use the same USB receiver for two Logitech devices. I’m using a K360 Keyboard and an M325 Mouse. Both devices come with their own (unifying) receiver, and with a piece of software I’ll combine them to use the same receiver. This allows me to free up one USB port on my computer and avoid conflicts with other devices at the same time.

The software is made by Logitech and can be found here: https://support.logitech.com/en_gb/software/unifying

How bring back the missing File Editor in WordPress

Every once in a while, users notice that the File Editor in WordPress may disappear. This has been happening for many years, and although I’ve read about this issue, it’s never happened to me – until very recently. I’m talking about the options under Appearance – Theme Editor and Plugins – Plugin Editor.

When these options are no longer showing up, it’s usually because a measure of security has ben added to your WordPress configuration file. Some plugins do this, but also some other security measures governed by your hosting administrator or server software (Plesk’s WordPress Toolkit for example).

To bring these options back, head over to your wp-config.php file and hunt for the DISALLOW_FILE_EDIT constant. When defined and set to true, the file editors will no longer show up. Set it to false and they should come back.

Installing Windows 10 on a MacBook Pro (2011) without Bootcamp

I love my old MacBook Pro. It does everything I want for a portable coding, writing and occasional editing device. I’ve had it since 2011 and it’s still going strong.

Apple however doesn’t want to suport it anymore. I’m stuck with macOS High Sierra, without an option to upgrade without shadowy patches. Even if I could keep up with Mojave and beyond, the hardware might just not be fast enough anymore to give me an enjoyable experience.

So I thought, perhaps I’ll put in a new hard drive that I had in another old laptop and install Windows 10 on it. Apple’s recommended way is to do all this from macOS, using their own Bootcamp setup. However, being the hacker that I am, I thought perhaps I’ll try the “Windows Only” experience.

I did this in two live streams the other night, and continued the process over the following days – and now I’ve got a (more or less working) Windows 10 installation on my MacBook Pro (early 2011 Edition). I thought I’d take some notes on how I did this step by step, and give you my opinions if this was an adventure worth undertaking.

Continue reading Installing Windows 10 on a MacBook Pro (2011) without Bootcamp

How to add File Upload Capabilities to the Contributor Role in WordPress

I never noticed this before, but it appears that the Contributor Role in WordPress does not come with ability to upload files to an instance. That’s slightly weird, given that most users will probably assign this role to users who shall be able to write content for a site, and with good content inevitably come images in this day and age.

According to WordPress, the roles included with WordPress are mere examples or “capability collections” so to speak, and we’re free to create our own, or add/remove capabilities from any role if we so desire. I did some digging and found out how that the add_cap() and remove_cap() functions do just that.

In this article I’ll show you how to add the upload_files() capability to the Contributor Role, without the need for yet another plugin.

Continue reading How to add File Upload Capabilities to the Contributor Role in WordPress

How to install Blender on CentOS 7

I’ve been trying to build Blender from source on CentOS for many years, but never had any luck making it work. There was always one package missing, or something else that needed to be configured. Depressed and resentful, I gave up and never got a chance to try Blender on CentOS.

Recently, the Blender Devs have started releasing a pre-compiled version of Blender for CentOS for download. This should work on RHEL and Fedora just as well. Huzzah!

With a fresh installation of CentOS looking at me from my old Samsung Q330 laptop, I thought I’d try it out. It works great! Here’s what I had to do to make it work, step by step.

Continue reading How to install Blender on CentOS 7

How to revert a yum update on CentOS

Every so often, a yum update brings unexpected results with it, like services no longer working due to spurious error messages that don’t tell you what’s actually wrong. This only very rarely happens though, and we may need to revert to the state of our system before such an update took place.

Thankfully, yum has a nice feature that helps us do this, namely yum history.

The command will bring up the latest 20 transactions by default, be those installs, updates or removals. There’s a transaction ID at the very front of each line, with which we can tell yum to undo said transaction. In my case, transaction 86 didn’t work out so well, so let’s undo whatever has happened there (in my case, a combination of installs, updates and overwrites).

Let’s revert those changes with yum history undo 86

The familiar text output comes up, eventually showing a list of packages that will be affected. Confirm those changes with y and let yum do it’s job.

After a few moments, our system has been restored to a state from before the update occurred, hopefully back into a running state.

There’s another interesting option called yum history rollback (ID). This will let us go back more than one step in our list, restoring the changes made by multiple transactions. Vivke’s article has more information on this.

How to create a read-only channel in Discord

Some of the simplest things to do often turn out to be the hardest ones – only because we have no idea how to do them properly. One of those tasks is setting up a simple read-only channel on Discord.

What I mean by that is a channel that you and perhaps an admin can post in (like a welcome or rules channel), readable by everybody, nut you don’t want anyone to be able to leave reactions or post messages in it. I’m fairly new to Discord, and while many features appear very intuitive, this one neither of us could work out for the longest time. Looks like I’ve finally found out how to do this, so let me share it with you before I forget.

Continue reading How to create a read-only channel in Discord

How to switch from JFIF to JPEG on Drag-and-Drop in Windows 10

I’ve recently noticed that when I drag an image out of Firefox, it saves itself as a JFIF image on Windows 10. Choosing to save the same image via the right-click context menu will save it as JPEG image as expected.

This perplexed me, so I did some research and found a fix that would let me save images with a .jpg extension when dragged out of a web browser. I did this by associating the correct file format in Registry Editor.

Let me show you how it works in this article.

What is JFIF again?

JFIF is apparently the JPEG File Interchange Format. Apparently it’s been around since 1991, but I’ve only heard of it in the summer of 2019. It just goes to show that you always learn something new. This Wikipedia article has a little more information about the format.

As to why on earth Windows is setup for this by default, or why Firefox is saving images with this format when dragging them out into a folder, or since when images are in fact stored as this format is anybody’s guess.

How do we make this “normal” again?

In Windows 10, search for “reg” at the bottom left corner until you find the Registry Editor. Open it.

This is a slightly intimidating database tool that associates many Windows-internal values with its settings and behaviour towards other apps, but don’t be discouraged by that. At the top left corner you’ll find the following menu. Open the first item on this list, namely HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT. It’ll open an amazingly long list of scary things.

Of course there’s no way to search through these 900 million entries, that would be too easy. However, they’re alphabetically ordered, which does help us out a little bit. I guess this tool is not exactly designed to be used by humans. Scroll down to the MIME folder and open it.

We’ll find another folder called Database, under which there’s one called Content Type. Open the latter to find yet another long list of scary things. This one will list all so-called MIME Content Types, which lets Windows determine with what extension it should save a file of a particular type.

Find the entry for image/jpeg and take a look at its contents by clicking on it. Notice that – shockingly – the Extension field is set to .jfif. This would explain why Windows keeps saving JPEG files with the .jfif extension. Who authorised that?!

It stands to reason that if we simply change this value from .jfif to .jpg, all our dragged-out images would henceforth be saved as regular JPEG images. Let’s double-click the word Extension (under Name) and change .jfif to .jpg then press return. That’s all we need to do.

Your entry should look like this:

Now you may close the Registry Editor and drag as many JPEG images out of your browser as you like. No restart is necessary.