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  • Jay Versluis 11:31 am on December 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: El Capitan   

    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    How to disable System Integrity Protection on OS X El Capitan 

    System Integrity Protection was introduced in El Capitan to add another layer of security to OS X. The system prevents the root user from doing things that are potentially harmful. Apple did this because any app at any time may ask for the administrator password and execute commands with elevated permissions, which is a big security risk on single user systems.

    There are downsides to yet another layer of security, and much like Gate Keeper, System Integrity Protection brings us one step closer to a completely locked off system like iOS. I guess that’s the long term plan.

    Until then, and if you need it, you can disable System Integrity Protection. Here’s how to do it:

    • boot into the Recovery Partition (hold down CMD + R during boot)
    • this takes a little longer than usual
    • when the system is back, select Utilities – Terminal
    • now type “csrutil disable”
    • close Terminal and restart the system

    You can check at any time if this feature is on or off by typing

    csrutil status
    
    System Integrity Protection status: disabled.
    

    Enable it again during a Recovery session by typing “csrutil enable” and El Capitan is secured again.

    To see what else this command has to offer, type csrutil without parameters:

    csrutil
    
    usage: csrutil <command>
    Modify the System Integrity Protection configuration. All configuration changes apply to the entire machine.
    Available commands:
    
        clear
            Clear the existing configuration. Only available in Recovery OS.
        disable
            Disable the protection on the machine. Only available in Recovery OS.
        enable
            Enable the protection on the machine. Only available in Recovery OS.
        status
            Display the current configuration.
    
        netboot
            add <address>
                Insert a new IPv4 address in the list of allowed NetBoot sources.
            list
                Print the list of allowed NetBoot sources.
            remove <address>
                Remove an IPv4 address from the list of allowed NetBoot sources.
    




     
  • Jay Versluis 6:06 pm on November 16, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: El Capitan   

    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    How to burn an ISO image with OS X El Capitan 

    El-Capitan

    Sometimes it’s important that things change for no apparent reason. You know, the way they move things around in supermarkets just to drive you crazy.

    If you’ve tried burning an ISO image to disk in El Capitan recently, you know what I’m talking about:

    because the option to burn an ISO has been removed from Disk Utility.

    Yeah, I get it: plastic disks are out, no one should be using them anymore, there are no more Macs with SuperDrives in production as of 2016, so it’s time to remove this option from the built-in utility that had it for the last ten years. Think different. It keeps you sharp.

    Lucky for us plastic spinners, there are two (not so obvious) solutions: the command line and the good old Finder that can still burn disks for us. Here’s how to do it.

    Using Finder

    Apparently Finder always had the option to burn a disk image. I never knew that! All we have to do is:

    • insert a new blank disk
    • navigate to our ISO image
    • select it (single-click)
    • head over to File – Burn Disk Image “xxx” to Disk

    Screen Shot 2015-11-16 at 18.00.40

    Using the Command Line

    It’s for hackers really, but it’s very simple:

    • insert a blank disk
    • open Utilities – Terminal
    • navigate to the folder that holds your ISO image
    • issue the following command:
    hdiutil burn /path/to/your/image.iso
    
    Preparing data for burn
    Opening session
    Opening track
    Writing track
    .................
    Closing track
    .................
    Closing session
    ...................................................................
    Finishing burn
    Verifying burn…
    Verifying
    .........................................................................
    Burn completed successfully
    .........................................................................
    hdiutil: burn: completed
    

    El Capitan. There’s just more to love with every click.





     
  • Jay Versluis 5:07 pm on November 4, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , El Capitan   

    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    How to use the new Apple System Font SAN FRANCISCO on your website 

    Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 16.58.08

    Apple have a new System Font in El Capitan and all of their other products starting 2015: it’s called San Francisco. It’s very similar to their previous font Helvetica Neue, but apparently San Francisco is better for your eyes (not to mention the fact that Helvetica Neue isn’t owned by Apple, and obviously we can’t have that).

    If you’ve tried searching for San Francisco on your Mac’s Font Book app, you’ll notice that it doesn’t seem to exist. Likewise, if you’re trying to use it in CSS it won’t work.

    Thanks to Craig Hockenberry I now know that this is because Apple haven’t exposed the font the usual way; rather, it can be used in web content and via CSS with a new property they’ve introduced. Here’s how:

    body {
      font-family: -apple-system, Helvetica Neue, sans-serif;
    }
    

    Replace body with your own CSS property, and on Apple devices running El Capitan, iOS 9, watchOS2 or tvOS, your web views will sport San Francisco. Other devices will show Helvetica Neue when installed, or use a generic sans-serif font.





     
  • Jay Versluis 11:24 am on November 4, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , El Capitan, OS X Server   

    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    OS X Server vs. Parallels Desktop – Overhead Differences 

    Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 10.28.17

    Ever wondered if there’s a difference in overhead and memory usage when you’re using a VM instead of OS X directly? Here’s a comparison for website hosting.

    The above graph shows the difference of hosting one of my websites for the last few days on OS X Server (in blue) that I got from Hostgator (using their HostGator Thanksgiving Deal 2016 coupon), and in a CentOS VM under Parallels Desktop 10 on the same hardware (in red).

    The traffic logs show that the amount of requests and visitors has remained the same, so we can deduce that the load put on either OS X and the VM is the same. There is a little more overhead when using the VM, but not as much as I had feared: the requests have to be forwarded to another software layer after all, and that takes some CPU power.

    Let’s have a look at memory next:

    (More …)





     
  • Jay Versluis 11:26 am on November 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: El Capitan, ,   

    Categories: MySQL ( 19 )

    How to install MySQL on Mac OS X El Capitan 

    MySQL 2015

    There are several ways to install MySQL on your Mac, for example:

    • compile from source
    • use the Homebrew package manager (http://brew.sh)
    • use a nifty script courtesy of Mac Mini Vault (http://git.io/eUx7rg)
    • or use the dedicated MySQL installer package (recommended)

    I recommend the dedicated installer because it’s the only package that will also add a convenient Preference Pane for starting and stopping the service.

    In this article I’ll focus on the latter, and I’ll also talk you through how to add MySQL to the PATH variable and how to secure MySQL to keep the evildoers away from your server.

    These instructions will work on Yosemite and El Capitan (I’ve tested it on both systems – in fact that’s part of why I’m writing this, so that I can remember for next time).

     

    Screen Shot 2015-11-02 at 10.40.12

    (More …)





     
    • Rob Wells 9:40 pm on April 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      This tutorial saved me a lot of time and did the trick. Many, many thanks

      • Jay Versluis 7:17 pm on April 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Great to hear!

    • imorenodev 2:12 pm on July 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for this!

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