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  • Jay Versluis 2:47 pm on December 12, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    How to check the Fan Speed on your Mac 

    Sometimes you may want to know how fast your fans are spinning, more as a “number value” rather than a “noise value”. While you can hear when your Mac in front of you is working hard, it’s impossible to tell how fast those fans are spinning when you’re miles away from your Mac in a data centre.

    Thankfully there is an easy way to read out the fan speed with a small built-in utility we can access from the command line. Launch a terminal session and issue spindump as admin user:

    sudo spindump
    
    Password:
    Sampling all processes for 10 seconds with 10 milliseconds of run time between samples
    Sampling completed, processing symbols...
    Spindump analysis written to file /tmp/spindump.txt
    

    It’ll take a few seconds, at the end of which a file is produced that tells you a lot more than just the fan speed. To filter this info out, issue the following:

    cat /tmp/spindump.txt | grep "Fan speed"
    Fan speed:       3151 rpm (-317)
    

    And there you have it! Execute this command under low load, then try again under heavy load to see your low and high spin numbers to get an impression how how busy your Mac’s fans are.

    To remove that temporary file and avoid your hard disk from being clogged up, issue this when you’re done:

    sudo rm /tmp/spindump.txt
    

    This may not be the most elegant way to read out your fan speeds, but it works without installing additional utilities. The spindump command is computationally expensive, so don’t do it continuously – there are better tools for that (such as smcFanControl, or others – see the link below).





     
    • Tom Cooper 5:35 pm on August 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      correct usage of grep command
      grep “Fan speed” /tmp/spindump.txt

  • Jay Versluis 11:31 am on December 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    How to disable System Integrity Protection on OS X El Capitan 

    System Integrity Protection was introduced in El Capitan to add another layer of security to OS X. The system prevents the root user from doing things that are potentially harmful. Apple did this because any app at any time may ask for the administrator password and execute commands with elevated permissions, which is a big security risk on single user systems.

    There are downsides to yet another layer of security, and much like Gate Keeper, System Integrity Protection brings us one step closer to a completely locked off system like iOS. I guess that’s the long term plan.

    Until then, and if you need it, you can disable System Integrity Protection. Here’s how to do it:

    • boot into the Recovery Partition (hold down CMD + R during boot)
    • this takes a little longer than usual
    • when the system is back, select Utilities – Terminal
    • now type “csrutil disable”
    • close Terminal and restart the system

    You can check at any time if this feature is on or off by typing

    csrutil status
    
    System Integrity Protection status: disabled.
    

    Enable it again during a Recovery session by typing “csrutil enable” and El Capitan is secured again.

    To see what else this command has to offer, type csrutil without parameters:

    csrutil
    
    usage: csrutil <command>
    Modify the System Integrity Protection configuration. All configuration changes apply to the entire machine.
    Available commands:
    
        clear
            Clear the existing configuration. Only available in Recovery OS.
        disable
            Disable the protection on the machine. Only available in Recovery OS.
        enable
            Enable the protection on the machine. Only available in Recovery OS.
        status
            Display the current configuration.
    
        netboot
            add <address>
                Insert a new IPv4 address in the list of allowed NetBoot sources.
            list
                Print the list of allowed NetBoot sources.
            remove <address>
                Remove an IPv4 address from the list of allowed NetBoot sources.
    




     
  • Jay Versluis 12:14 pm on November 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Linux, Mac OS X ( 96 )

    How to see which users are logged in on OS X and Linux 

    There are two funky commands that can help us see who’s currently logged in, and what operations were performed last. Those two commands are who and last.

    Let me show you how to use them.

    The who command

    Type who at the command prompt and you’ll see a list of currently logged-in users:

    who
    
    versluis tty1         2015-11-19 11:21 (:0)
    root     pts/0        2015-11-19 11:46 (10.0.1.55)
    

    This system has two users logged in: versluis, via TTY, and root via PTS. We also get to see which IP addresses these users are logged in from (:0 is localhost).

    On this note, TTY is the local text based terminal at the machine, while PTS is a pseudo-terminal. This is most likely an SSH session or similar, anything that’s happening remotely.

    who can also show us who we are, in case you’re ever logged in on a system and don’t know which user you are:

    who am i
    
    your-username-here
    

    You can also concatenate who am i into whoami.

    The last command

    The last command can take a moment to execute and will show a list similar to this:

    last
    
    versluis tty1         :0               Tue Feb 10 18:54 - down  (4+13:11)   
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-504.8.1.e Tue Feb 10 18:51 - 08:05 (4+13:14)   
    root     pts/1        10.0.1.43        Tue Feb 10 16:33 - 16:44  (00:10)    
    root     pts/0        10.0.1.52        Tue Feb 10 11:36 - down   (07:13)    
    versluis pts/0        :0.0             Tue Feb 10 11:35 - 11:35  (00:00)    
    versluis tty1         :0               Tue Feb 10 11:29 - down   (07:20)    
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-504.8.1.e Tue Feb 10 11:27 - 18:50  (07:22)    
    root     tty1                          Tue Feb 10 11:16 - down   (00:09)    
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-504.8.1.e Tue Feb 10 11:15 - 11:25  (00:10)    
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-504.8.1.e Tue Feb 10 10:59 - 11:25  (00:26)    
    root     tty1                          Tue Feb 10 10:29 - down   (00:28)    
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-504.el6.i Tue Feb 10 10:28 - 10:58  (00:29)    
    
    wtmp begins Tue Feb 10 10:28:53 2015
    

    You can see who has logged in to the system recently, from which IP address, and when each session started and finished. You can also see when the system was last restarted (and in Linux, which Kernel was used to do so).

    The last line (on Linux, beginning with wtmp) shows since when the command was able to display results. last and who both read a file called wtmp (in /var/log/wtmp), which logs all login attempts over time.

    last accepts several filtering options too. For example, to query when a particular user has logged on and off, type last followed by the username:

    last versluis
    
    versluis tty1         :0               Thu Nov 19 11:21   still logged in   
    versluis tty1         :0               Tue Nov 17 12:44 - 22:32  (09:48)    
    versluis tty1         :0               Tue Nov 17 11:13 - down   (01:29)    
    versluis tty1         :0               Sat Oct 31 23:35 - crash (16+12:37)  
    versluis tty1         :0               Sun Aug  9 09:09 - down  (83+14:24)  
    versluis tty1         :0               Tue Jun 30 18:03 - down  (39+15:04)  
    versluis pts/0        10.0.1.52        Thu Feb 19 14:41 - 18:34  (03:52)
    

    Or if you’re only interested in restarts:

    last reboot
    
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-573.8.1.e Thu Nov 19 11:20 - 12:02  (00:41)    
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-573.8.1.e Tue Nov 17 12:43 - 12:02 (1+23:18)   
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-573.7.1.e Tue Nov 17 11:12 - 12:42  (01:29)    
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-573.7.1.e Sat Oct 31 23:34 - 12:42 (16+14:07)  
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-573.1.1.e Sun Aug  9 09:08 - 23:33 (83+14:24)  
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-504.23.4. Tue Jun 30 18:02 - 09:07 (39+15:05)  
    reboot   system boot  2.6.32-504.8.1.e Sun Feb 15 11:30 - 09:07 (174+20:37) 
    

    On OS X the output is somewhat more limited due to the absence of kernels, but it works just the same. For more information on each command, checkout the man pages with man last and man who.





     
  • Jay Versluis 6:06 pm on November 16, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    How to burn an ISO image with OS X El Capitan 

    El-Capitan

    Sometimes it’s important that things change for no apparent reason. You know, the way they move things around in supermarkets just to drive you crazy.

    If you’ve tried burning an ISO image to disk in El Capitan recently, you know what I’m talking about:

    because the option to burn an ISO has been removed from Disk Utility.

    Yeah, I get it: plastic disks are out, no one should be using them anymore, there are no more Macs with SuperDrives in production as of 2016, so it’s time to remove this option from the built-in utility that had it for the last ten years. Think different. It keeps you sharp.

    Lucky for us plastic spinners, there are two (not so obvious) solutions: the command line and the good old Finder that can still burn disks for us. Here’s how to do it.

    Using Finder

    Apparently Finder always had the option to burn a disk image. I never knew that! All we have to do is:

    • insert a new blank disk
    • navigate to our ISO image
    • select it (single-click)
    • head over to File – Burn Disk Image “xxx” to Disk

    Screen Shot 2015-11-16 at 18.00.40

    Using the Command Line

    It’s for hackers really, but it’s very simple:

    • insert a blank disk
    • open Utilities – Terminal
    • navigate to the folder that holds your ISO image
    • issue the following command:
    hdiutil burn /path/to/your/image.iso
    
    Preparing data for burn
    Opening session
    Opening track
    Writing track
    .................
    Closing track
    .................
    Closing session
    ...................................................................
    Finishing burn
    Verifying burn…
    Verifying
    .........................................................................
    Burn completed successfully
    .........................................................................
    hdiutil: burn: completed
    

    El Capitan. There’s just more to love with every click.





     
  • Jay Versluis 5:07 pm on November 4, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    How to use the new Apple System Font SAN FRANCISCO on your website 

    Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 16.58.08

    Apple have a new System Font in El Capitan and all of their other products starting 2015: it’s called San Francisco. It’s very similar to their previous font Helvetica Neue, but apparently San Francisco is better for your eyes (not to mention the fact that Helvetica Neue isn’t owned by Apple, and obviously we can’t have that).

    If you’ve tried searching for San Francisco on your Mac’s Font Book app, you’ll notice that it doesn’t seem to exist. Likewise, if you’re trying to use it in CSS it won’t work.

    Thanks to Craig Hockenberry I now know that this is because Apple haven’t exposed the font the usual way; rather, it can be used in web content and via CSS with a new property they’ve introduced. Here’s how:

    body {
      font-family: -apple-system, Helvetica Neue, sans-serif;
    }
    

    Replace body with your own CSS property, and on Apple devices running El Capitan, iOS 9, watchOS2 or tvOS, your web views will sport San Francisco. Other devices will show Helvetica Neue when installed, or use a generic sans-serif font.





     
  • Jay Versluis 11:24 am on November 4, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , OS X Server   

    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    OS X Server vs. Parallels Desktop – Overhead Differences 

    Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 10.28.17

    Ever wondered if there’s a difference in overhead and memory usage when you’re using a VM instead of OS X directly? Here’s a comparison for website hosting.

    The above graph shows the difference of hosting one of my websites for the last few days on OS X Server (in blue) that I got from Hostgator (using their HostGator Thanksgiving Deal 2016 coupon), and in a CentOS VM under Parallels Desktop 10 on the same hardware (in red).

    The traffic logs show that the amount of requests and visitors has remained the same, so we can deduce that the load put on either OS X and the VM is the same. There is a little more overhead when using the VM, but not as much as I had feared: the requests have to be forwarded to another software layer after all, and that takes some CPU power.

    Let’s have a look at memory next:

    (More …)





     
  • Jay Versluis 8:57 am on June 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    How to kill the “accept incoming connections” dialogue on your Mac forever 

    Screen Shot 2015-06-02 at 08.28.12Have you ever come across the above dialogue, asking if you’d like to “accept incoming network connections” on your Mac? It’s caused by the Firewall and it’s meant to be helpful. Because if you have an app that needs incoming network connections all the time, you can just add them to the Firewall rules (under System Preferences – Security – Firewall).

    But of course, it doesn’t always work. Some apps get updated and this message starts appearing out of the blue, no matter if it hasn’t happened before or if you’ve manually added said app to the Firewall rules a thousand times already. God only knows whatever is upsetting our precious operating system, but it’s driving us all nuts.

    Help is at hand: turns out these messages are caused by some certificate issue I genuinely do not care to know about – nor should I have to. Here’s a “relatively easy” way to fix it once and for all. There are other ways which involve more typing, or switching off the Firewall altogether, but the following is by far the quickest option in my opinion:

    • open a Finder window and navigate to the app in question (usually in Applications, potentially in a subfolder)
    • open a Terminal Session (under Applications – Utilities – Terminal)
    • type cd followed by a space
    • from the Finder window, drag the folder in which your app resides into the Terminal window
    • hit return (this will put you into the same directory as your app)
    • type the following scary line of code:
    sudo codesign --force --deep --sign - ./YourApp.app
    

    Replace “YourApp.app” with the actual name of the app, including the .app extension. You will be prompted for your password and in a few moments you should see a message such as “replacing existing signature”. With this code your Mac will have created a self-signed ad-hoc certificate, re-signing the app.

    Don’t worry if this doesn’t sound English, all it means is that we’re telling the operating system (or rather, Keychain Access) that “the Administrator says it’s OK to trust this app”.

    Now launch your app again. Don’t be dismayed when you see that annoying “accept incoming connections” dialogue again – it’ll be the last time. Select “allow” and you’re done with this – hopefully for good. Try it out by closing your app and restart it again. Celebrate about not seeing that message again.

    Should this trick not work, leave out the –deep switch, and make sure your file does not have a trailing slash. Oh, and preface any spaces in the file name with a backslash.

    Kudos to ahall over on Stack Exchange for this tip! It’s made me a much happier person again 🙂





     
    • wpguru.co.uk@vickishome.com 9:09 am on February 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you!! Thank you!! This has been plaguing me for months. I could not find the answer anywhere else. I just tried it on two of my apps, and now they load without that annoying popup!

  • Jay Versluis 9:33 am on May 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    How to reset the PRAM (or NVRAM) on your Mac 

    On a recent chat with Apple support, the representative suggested I reset my PRAM. From what I understand this will clear BIOS like values that may cause a Mac to malfunction. It only takes a second to do – here’s how:

    Press CMD+OPTION+P+R, then start the system. You’ll need three hands or a portable keyboard to do it.

    Hold those four keys down until you hear a second startup chime (or if you’ve previously disabled in, until you hear one chime).

    That’s it!

    Note that there are technical differences between the PRAM, NVRAM and the SMC, but I really don’t know what they are. You can reset them all to make your Mac behave if it’s doing weird things though.





     
  • Jay Versluis 7:34 am on May 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    How to start Mac OS X Yosemite in Safe Mode 

    Hold down SHIFT during normal boot, until the loading bar appears. It will take longer than usual to start the system. Some services are not available.

    Safe Mode will clear several caches and verify the startup disks.

    From the command line, or on remote systems, boot into Safe Mode using this:

    sudo nvram boot-args="-x"
    

    When you want to boot into “normal” mode again, change the startup parameters to nothing:

    sudo nvram boot-args=""
    

    Very handy article from the Apple Knowledge Base:





     
  • Jay Versluis 3:23 pm on March 27, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Finder   

    Categories: Mac OS X ( 34 )

    How to show hidden files in the Mac Finder 

    Hidden files start with a . on UNIX like systems and OS X is one of them. While we can show hidden files in a Ternimal session by using something like ls -a, it’s not so easy to convince the Finder to show such files.

    If ever you need to see them, execute the following from the command line:

    defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles YES
    

    Now relaunch Finder ALT-right-clicking the Finder icon in the dock. Choose Relaunch.

    Screen Shot 2015-03-27 at 15.17.42

    Next time you open a Finder window – either on its own or via an app – you’ll see all kinds of files you didn’t even know existed. They all begin with a dot and are slightly lighter in colour. Others are system folders, such as Library.

    So many new files can make your file navigation a little cluttered – which is why it’s good to know how to switch this feature off again. Same command as above, but this time we’ll say no:

    defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles NO
    

    Thanks to Ian Lunn for this tip:





     
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