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  • Jay Versluis 5:44 pm on October 4, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , htaccess   

    Categories: How To ( 29 )

    Apache: How to block all other IPs except for your own 

    Sometimes I have to work on WordPress sites that are too busy to display the admin interface. This can happen if there’s more traffic than the server can cope with. In such cases, we may need to tell every visitor to come back later while we carry out some maintenance.

    But how? Thanks to an Apache command to block all IP addresses, except for our own. We can even display a “maintenance” page while we’re hard at work behind the scenes.

    Let’s see how. Add the following to your .htaccess file in the web root directory, replacing 12.34.56.78 with your own IP address:

    ErrorDocument 403 /maintenance.html
    Order Allow,Deny
    Allow from 12.34.56.78
    

    Save the file on the server and see the site speed up as of by magic. No more requests but your own shall be processed henceforth.

    Thanks to MickeyRush and b101101011011011 for this solution on Stack Overflow:

    How do I find my own IP?

    There are several services that will display the IP you’re currently connecting from. Head over to http://whatsmyip.org, or type “my ip” into Google.

    Does this work with NGINX too

    I’m sure the principle does, but I know very little about NGINX configuration. The above directive is for Apache only. If you know how this works in NGINX, please leave a comment below.





     
  • Jay Versluis 12:06 pm on December 30, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Stack Overflow   

    Categories: How To ( 29 )

    How to find your starred questions (favourites) in Stack Overflow 

    Stack-Favourites

    You can mark questions in the Stack Exchange network simply by clicking the little star icon. A yellow star means you’ve marked it as a favourite, a grey one means you haven’t. It’s a convenient bookmarking system.

    But where can you see a list of what you’ve starred? It’s not exactly obvious, so let me show you how to access your favourited questions and up voted answers. I’m using Stack Overflow as an example, but the principle is the same on all Stack Exchange sites.

    • head over to your Stack Overflow profile (click on your badge at the top)
    • find favorites at the bottom
    • now select added to see your starred/favourited questions
    • or select votes to see which answers you’ve up-voted

    Hope this helps!





     
  • Jay Versluis 7:09 pm on September 25, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Categories: How To ( 29 )

    How to open up your Samsung NC10 

    Here’s a great video by Floppydonkey on how to open up your Samsung NC10 (and NC150). This comes in handy if you’d like to replace the hard disk.

    The tools we need are a small philips head screwdriver, a small flat screwdriver or spudger, and a tough finger nail.

    In a nutshell, and VERY CAREFULLY:

    • turn your little buddy over onto a soft surface (lid closed, top down so that the back is facing you, headphone sockets face left)
    • take off the battery
    • loosen all screws, including those marked KEYBD (leave the ones for the memory flap)
    • where the battery once was, take the flat screwdriver and pop the two black plastic clips, just next to the two metal parts (inwards). Those are the two main clips that hold the tiny plastic body together.
    • take a tough fingernail and pop the back of the laptop where the battery sat (between those metal clips)
    • once done, lift the right side of the back first, leaving the headphone sockets
    • this is a bit fragile, but the whole back will lift off to the left
    • take out the cover from the headphone sockets
    • you’re done!

    The hard drive is held with one screw, simply take it out and slide the hard disk to the right, off the connector. It’s enclosed in a shelf of sorts, which is held onto the drive with two screws opposed the connector.

    Put everything back together in reverse order.

    Good luck!





     
  • Jay Versluis 10:18 am on September 18, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Categories: How To, Windows ( 29 )

    What are the credentials to your AirPort Time Capsule 

    AIrPort Time Capsule

    There is something I keep forgetting time and time again: the credentials to my AirPort Time Capsule. It serves as my router, Time Machine Backup disk and even as shared storage for internal use, thanks to an attached USB drive.

    All our Macs connect to both drives automatically and without fail – but every once in a while we want to access something on the shared drive, either via Windows or another app like GoodReader. And every time I forget what those credentials are – particularly the user name.

    Because there just isn’t a dialogue to set it up.

    The password is fairly obvious because it’s something you’ve added when you set the device up. Chances are you can remember it. You can even reset it by pressing the reset button at the back of the device for one second – but not longer, or it’ll reset to factory settings). AirPort Utility will help guide you through this.

    But the user name? What is it? Something generic maybe? The name of the attached drive? Steve Job’s daughter?

    Turns out there isn’t one. Put anything you like. Seriously. I know it’s weird, and it’s just not how a computer brain works. The user name can’t just be arbitrary – but on Time Capsule it is. So use any user name you like.

    It doesn’t matter what as long as you put something into that field. Your uncle’s boyfriend’s pet name, or the day of the week. Anything. Just for heaven’s sake don’t leave it blank or the universe as we know it will seize to exist in a moment’s notice.

    But I guess nobody tells you this in the shiny brochure.

    And in case I forget how to connect those drives in Windows, here’s a quick reminder for completion:

     

    Connecting to the Time Capsule drives (Windows)

    Technically you can connect to the Time Capsule drives via two protocols: Samba and AFP. The latter however is only used on Apple computers. So with Windows and Linux, Samba it is.

    In Windows we can map a network drive by heading over to the

    • Windows Explorer
    • find My Computer (Windows 7)
    • or This PC (Windows 8.1)
    • select Map Network drive at the top of the window

    This will bring up a dialogue that shows a drive letter drop down and asks for a server path:

    Screen Shot 2014-09-16 at 20.27.51

    The browse option won’t find your Time Capsule – instead find the IP address on your network (usually it’s 10.0.1.1, but AirPort Utility will verify this for you in the “LAN IP” field). Add it into the path/folder field like this:

     

    \\10.0.1.1\drivename

     

    Two backslashes, followed by your IP address, followed by your drive name. If you don’t specify a drive name the operation will fail. If your drive name has spaces (like “Shared Data”) then just write them out – no need to escape them. CapItaLisAtiON is important here though.

    Hit finish and your drive should be accessible.

    To find your drive names, consult your friend the AirPort Utility. GoodReader on iOS will find those names automatically – but Windows does not.

    And that’s that: another puzzle solved. There is no user name when accessing a Time Capsule drive.





     
  • Jay Versluis 6:07 pm on August 23, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Categories: How To ( 29 )

    How to enable automatic user logins on Mac OS X Yosemite 

    Screen Shot 2014-08-23 at 17.49.01By default Yosemite doesn’t like users to auto-login when the system starts. Instead you have to select a user, type in the password, and then the system starts to boot. Not necessarily what we want.

    To disable this feature you usually head over to

    • System Preferences
    • Users and Groups
    • Login Options

    and pick your default user from that handy drop down menu. Notice however that this is greyed out on Yosemite:

    Screen Shot 2014-08-23 at 17.47.59

    So what gives?

    Turns out that this option is not available if you’ve agreed to encrypt your disk via FileVault. And it makes sense too: otherwise your hard disk data could be accessed upon boot without a password, rendering this feature useless.

    Hence, to bring back automatic logins, turn off FileVault under

    • System Preferences
    • Security and Privacy
    • FileVault

    Screen Shot 2014-08-23 at 17.56.24

    According to this system, I can do that in about 32 days…

    Notice that if you use your iCloud password as the login password, auto-logins are also disabled. In which case, change your login password to a “separate password”, switch off FileVault and voila – auto logins are back at your disposal.

    Screen Shot 2014-08-23 at 18.02.06





     
    • Itaque 3:15 pm on August 3, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I tried doing this, made sure I am using a different password than iCloud and turned file vault off and unlocked my settings in groups and chose my account from the pull down menu but it still asks me for my password WHY!

    • Erich 1:14 am on October 4, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      my vault IS NOT ON but everything is encrypted anyway (for some reason) How do I shut off password login? And why do I have to remember MORE passwords to get rid of using one all the time, even though I:m sure I’ll be forced to use it later (again , for some reason) I don’t ever want to use a password again , and someone steals some of my files, then they probably need them more than I do, and think leaving them out to be stolen is my right anyway! I mean, they’re my files, right?. Please respond.

      • Jay Versluis 11:37 pm on October 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Pass I’m afraid, Erich: if your FileVault is not on, and you’re not using an Apple ID to login, and the Automatic Login option is set to your current user, and you’re still being asked for a password, then I’m afraid I have no idea what’s up with your system. May I suggest a visit to the Genius Bar, or perhaps a call to Apple Support.

  • Jay Versluis 5:59 pm on July 25, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Firefox,   

    Categories: How To ( 29 )

    How to clear your Browser Cache 

    Apple SafariWeb Browsers like to save websites that you’ve visited earlier to speed up how quickly they can be displayed.

    Everything that should be downloaded from the web is saved as local files (up to a point), and if a browser sees that you’re visiting site again that you’ve just been to, he serves the saved files rather than request them from the web again.

    You can clear this cache and force the browser to load the results from the web. Eventually the cache clears itself, but it depends on “when the browser feels like it”.

    Safari

    If you’re using Safari, you can clear the cache by heading to Safari – Reset Safari. Tick “reset all website data” is usually enough, but you can clear several other things while you’re there too (like the history).

    Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 17.33.20

    Firefox

    On Firefox this option is option is rather hidden under Firefox – Preferences – Advanced – Network, and under Cached Web Content there’s a button “clear now”. It’s always good to have a second browser installed just so you can check up on the other one (and trust neither).

    Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 17.33.20

    Alternatively, hold down CMD on Mac (or CTRL on Windows) and reload a page – this sometimes works on a “per page” basis, especially if you don’t trust what you’re seeing.

    iOS also has this option under Settings – Safari – Clear History and Website Data.

    Just something to keep in mind when you’re seeing unexpected results.

    Thanks to Jerry and his new book for this article – I just explained this to him in an email and thought this would make an excellent blog post 😉





     
  • Jay Versluis 11:40 pm on August 10, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , File Permissions, , Time Machine   

    Categories: How To ( 29 )

    How to fix permission problems when restoring folders from Time Machine Backups 

    Airport TimeCapsuleI had an odd problem the other day: I wanted to restore a fairly large folder from my new AirPort TimeCapsule. But the restore always stopped at one particular file, with an error message about permission problems.

    The folder in question was about 4GB in size and contained just over 10.000 files in total. I was baffled! Time Machine had never failed me before, so what was going on out of a sudden?

    Well I guess it’s a computer, and things just go wrong sometimes. Thanks to Apple Support this problem is now solved – and I thought I’d share the insight, both with you all and my future self.

    (More …)





     
  • Jay Versluis 10:22 am on June 5, 2013 Permalink | Reply  
    Categories: How To, Plugins ( 29 )

    How to style the Tumblr Widget Sidebar Plugin 

    tumblr-logoI’ve been recently using Tumblr more to post sketches from all kinds of devices, and naturally I wanted to embed them in some of my websites’ sidebars.

    I found the extremely helpful Tumblr Widget plugin by Gabriel Roth for this: install, drag in the widget add Tumblr URL. Done!

    I wanted my images to be in a size that the widget didn’t offer, so I did some tweaking – perhaps it’ll help if you’re in a similar situation.

    (More …)





     
  • Jay Versluis 12:05 am on May 1, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Autodesk, SketchBook Pro   

    Categories: How To ( 29 )

    How to switch SketchBook Pro 6 into Full Screen Mode 

    SketchBookPro-LogoThe Mac version of Autodesk’s SketchBook Pro 6 works well on small screen – but since real estate is limited, there is a way to switch the app to Full Screen Mode.

    Rather than the double-arrow in the top right corner though, you’ll have to use the shortcut

    OPTION+CTRL+J

    Don’t ask me why, it’s not very well documented for such an intuitive app. And since I keep forgetting how to do this, here it is in writing.

    Thanks to Eric from Autodesk for this tip (discussion)





     
  • Jay Versluis 6:01 am on January 26, 2013 Permalink | Reply  
    Categories: Dreamweaver, How To ( 12 )

    How to update jQuery Mobile in Dreamweaver CS6 

    Adobe_Dreamweaver_CS6_IconSince the release of Adobe’s Dreamweaver CS6 the jQuery and jQuery Mobile libraries have been updated. This means that when you create a new Mobile Starter page, you’ll get outdated libraries by default.

    With a bit of hacking we can change this to the most current version though. Let me show you how it worked for me – many thanks to Greg’s article on how to do this in Dreamweaver CS5.5.

    (More …)





     
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