Category Archives: How To

How to find your Twitch Stream Key (2019)

The Twitch web interface changes what feels like every two months, which means I can never find my Twitch streaming key (granted, we only needed when setting up a new package). So for February 2019, here’s how to find it:

Login to Twitch.tv and head over to the top right corner and click on your User Name and Icon. Choose Dashboard.

On the right hand side, you’ll see a list of options. We’re looking for one called Channel, underneath the Settings Headline. It’s towards the bottom of the list.

Once selected, you’ll see a big box at the top reading Stream Key and Preferences. Your key is hidden by default, and you can either display it or copy it to your clipboard. You even have the option to reset it from here, should the need ever arise.

There. Quick and to the point. If this procedure ever changes, please let me know and I’ll update this article accordingly.

Happy streaming 🙂

How to download videos from YouTube in 1080p

When I do live streams on YouTube, I frequently forget to record my programme locally. I guess there’s just so many buttons to press in the heat of the moment.

Hence I was looking for a way to extract full 1080p HD footage from YouTube, ideally both for my own files as well as those from other users.

Right now (February 2019), YouTube only allows me to download a 720p version of my own clips, and a YouTube Premium subscription is required to download other users’ footage. Either way, my desktop streams are usually 1080p, and that’s what I’d like to download for local archiving. 

I hunted around for a solution, and doing a quick Google search presented several contenders – many of which no longer work since YouTube have once again re-jigged some aspect of their operation. Most solutions, online and offline, can handle 720p for free, but again that’s not what I was looking for.

Thankfully I found a Firefox Add-On by a developer named Dishita, called Easy YouTube Downloader. It’s available for free from the Firefox Add-Ons repository.

Easy YouTube Downloader in action
Continue reading How to download videos from YouTube in 1080p

Disassembling my PlayStation 3 to apply new Thermal Paste

My Playstation 3 console started making a super loud fan noise the other day. Research indicates that this is likely due to a combination of dust and dried out thermal paste inside the console. So I took it apart and made a time-lapse while I was at it.

In this episode I’ll talk you through the specifics and explain what I’m doing and mention pitfalls of what to expect once inside the PS3 Super Slim. The whole procedure was not as difficult as I had imagined, and I’m very happy to say that since I’ve replaced the paste, my console is nice and quiet again.

I’m following this teardown guide from iFixit:
https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/PlayStation+3+Super+Slim+Teardown+-+Video+tutorial/24914

You’ll need a regular #1 Philips screwdriver and a specialised Torx T8 screwdriver for tamper proof screws (it’s the one with a little hole in the middle).

Here’s thermal paste I’m using (it’s called Arctic MX-4):
https://amzn.to/2EhuKbN

The Jan Beta video I’m mentioning is here:

In this episode I’ll show you how to configure our Podcast Category with the relevant settings that are necessary for the feed to have meaningful content. I’ll talk about every single tab, including the Feed Description, specific Apple iTunes and Google Settings, how to add artwork and how to preview the feed.

Catch this episode on my WP Guru Podcast:

How to split a ZIP file into multiple parts on macOS and Linux

ZIP files can get quite large, depending on the amount of data we’re ZIPping up there. Having one huge file may not always be desirable, for example when making hard copies onto disk or tape media, or when upload limitations force the use of smaller files.

Thankfully, the clever little ZIP utility has a handy function that can split our archive into smaller chunks for later re-assembly. Here’s how it works:

This will create an archive of all files and subfolders in myfiles, creating a new file every 200MiB (about 10% more than 200MB). We can use K, G and T respectively (for KiB, GiB and TiB, all of which are 10% more than kilobyte, gigabyte and terabyte).

To clarify, the s switch will specify the size of each file, while the -r switch tells ZIP to do this operation recursively.

As a result, we’ll see a list of files like this:

To extract any or all of our files again, we can use the UNZIP utility. All we need to do now is to treat archive.zip as our main file and let UNZIP handle the rest. It will understand that all z** files are part of the multivolume archive. For example:

will list all files contained in our archive, not matter which files they’re physically contained in.

Should any of the volume files be missing or damaged, none of the archive can be read as far as I know. Make sure you leave them all in place and don’t try to open them by itself.

How to remove files from ZIP Archives in macOS and Linux

When ZIP up directories, particularly on macOS, some files may find their way into our ZIP archives that were never meant to be there. I’m thinking of those pesky .DS_Store and __MACOSX files, maybe even .htaccess files. For *nix based systems, * really means “everything”.

The ZIP command line tool let us remove such unwanted files from an existing archive. Here’s how:

The -d switch tells ZIP to hunt for and delete the unwanted files. Files whose names contain spaces can be defined in “regular quotes”, and the * asterisk can be used as usual.

For example, to remove all DS_Store files and __MACOSX files, we can use this:

To verify that such idiosyncrasies have indeed been removed from a ZIP archive before we release it into the wide, we can check with the UNZIP utility:

This will simply list the contents of your-archive.zip without actually extracting it.

How to add files to an existing ZIP Archive on macOS and Linux

Sometimes it’s easy to delete a ZIP file and create a new one – say you’ve forgotten to include a file. Just drag it into the folder to be ZIPped up and start again.

However, the clever little ZIP command line tool has a built-in ability to simply add a file to an existing archive without us having to do any manual grunt work. That can come in handy when we no longer have access to existing unZIPped content.

Here’s how it works:

We can even add entire directories this way too, like so:

This will recursively add all files (indulging hidden and annoying ones) to our file.

Note that ZIP accomplishes this by temporarily extracting all files before creating a new archive for is (while deleting our original file). So in essence, the tools is doing what we’d do manually, just more conveniently and in the background without bothering us.

How to make turn URLs into clickable links in the_content()

The P2 theme has a nice feature built-in: the ability to turn URLs into clickable links on the fly. It does this by using a WordPress built-in function called make_clickable().

Here’s how we can use this function to make this feature available to any theme.

The above code, once inserted into your child theme’s functions.php file, will take the_content(), pass it to the make_clickable() function, and then return it before it’s printed on the screen.

The advantage of using it this way is that no content in the database is modified, and it’s easy to remove this feature when it’s not needed anymore. Feel free to add conditions depending on categories or other factors (you could check if the string “http” is present in the_content(), or only do this with .com endings, etc).

Learn more about this function here: https://codex.wordpress.org/Function_Reference/make_clickable