Category Archives: How To

How to tell Twitch which game you’re streaming

I was wondering how Twitch.tv knew which game people were streaming. I had seen such an option in YouTube, and when I broadcast something from my PS4 console the game gets set automatically – but when I use OBS, I’m in total control of the meta data.

Would Twitch figure this out automatically? That would be quite a feat of engineering indeed… and of course, that’s not how it work. Twitch has no idea what data I’ll be streaming. We’ll have to tell it manually.

Apparently there once was an option to set the game in a field called “playing”. However, no matter how hard I’ve tried to look for it (in 2019), that option doesn’t seem to exist any more.

Turns out it’s now called the Category field, and here’s how to set it:

  • head over to your Twitch Dashboard
  • that too has changed recently; if you can’t find it, login at Twitch.tv, then click on your Icon at the top right

  • under the Live option, you’ll be able to set your Stream Title, Category, Tags and Language
  • start typing your game title into the Category Field and see it start populating itself
  • pick your game from the list and you’re good to go

That’s how to do it!

PS: You can That’s how to do it!

PS: You can update this information while you’re live, so if you decide to switch to a different game halfway through your stream, that’s where to do it. Twitch will create a new chapter mark when you do this in your live stream. I guess it makes it easy for viewers to jump to the start of a new game in an otherwise uninterrupted stream.

The Category can also be changed for existing videos in your library: if you need to update the information in any of those, head over to the Video Producer (from your Icon at the top right). Choose the video in question, and on the right hand side, click on that three dots icon and choose Edit.

That’s where you can change the thumbnail, update the description and change the Category.

How to install the British Spell Checker in Firefox

I admit my language needs are a little bit less “normal” than those of most people:

I live in the US, I write things in English most of my time, but I’m used to writing with British spelling and grammar – and occasionally I write in German too. So that makes managing languages on the myriad of devices I’m using sightly tricky.

In this article I’ll show you how to change your language settings in Firefox.

Continue reading How to install the British Spell Checker in Firefox

Creating a Podcast Feed with WordPress and PowerPress – Part 2

In this episode I’ll show you how to configure our Podcast Category with the relevant settings that are necessary for the feed to have meaningful content. I’ll talk about every single tab, including the Feed Description, specific Apple iTunes and Google Settings, how to add artwork and how to preview the feed.

Catch this episode on my WP Guru Podcast:

How to split a ZIP file into multiple parts on macOS and Linux

ZIP files can get quite large, depending on the amount of data we’re ZIPping up there. Having one huge file may not always be desirable, for example when making hard copies onto disk or tape media, or when upload limitations force the use of smaller files.

Thankfully, the clever little ZIP utility has a handy function that can split our archive into smaller chunks for later re-assembly. Here’s how it works:

This will create an archive of all files and subfolders in myfiles, creating a new file every 200MiB (about 10% more than 200MB). We can use K, G and T respectively (for KiB, GiB and TiB, all of which are 10% more than kilobyte, gigabyte and terabyte).

To clarify, the s switch will specify the size of each file, while the -r switch tells ZIP to do this operation recursively.

As a result, we’ll see a list of files like this:

To extract any or all of our files again, we can use the UNZIP utility. All we need to do now is to treat archive.zip as our main file and let UNZIP handle the rest. It will understand that all z** files are part of the multivolume archive. For example:

will list all files contained in our archive, not matter which files they’re physically contained in.

Should any of the volume files be missing or damaged, none of the archive can be read as far as I know. Make sure you leave them all in place and don’t try to open them by itself.

How to remove files from ZIP Archives in macOS and Linux

When ZIP up directories, particularly on macOS, some files may find their way into our ZIP archives that were never meant to be there. I’m thinking of those pesky .DS_Store and __MACOSX files, maybe even .htaccess files. For *nix based systems, * really means “everything”.

The ZIP command line tool let us remove such unwanted files from an existing archive. Here’s how:

The -d switch tells ZIP to hunt for and delete the unwanted files. Files whose names contain spaces can be defined in “regular quotes”, and the * asterisk can be used as usual.

For example, to remove all DS_Store files and __MACOSX files, we can use this:

To verify that such idiosyncrasies have indeed been removed from a ZIP archive before we release it into the wide, we can check with the UNZIP utility:

This will simply list the contents of your-archive.zip without actually extracting it.

How to add files to an existing ZIP Archive on macOS and Linux

Sometimes it’s easy to delete a ZIP file and create a new one – say you’ve forgotten to include a file. Just drag it into the folder to be ZIPped up and start again.

However, the clever little ZIP command line tool has a built-in ability to simply add a file to an existing archive without us having to do any manual grunt work. That can come in handy when we no longer have access to existing unZIPped content.

Here’s how it works:

We can even add entire directories this way too, like so:

This will recursively add all files (indulging hidden and annoying ones) to our file.

Note that ZIP accomplishes this by temporarily extracting all files before creating a new archive for is (while deleting our original file). So in essence, the tools is doing what we’d do manually, just more conveniently and in the background without bothering us.

How to make turn URLs into clickable links in the_content()

The P2 theme has a nice feature built-in: the ability to turn URLs into clickable links on the fly. It does this by using a WordPress built-in function called make_clickable().

Here’s how we can use this function to make this feature available to any theme.

The above code, once inserted into your child theme’s functions.php file, will take the_content(), pass it to the make_clickable() function, and then return it before it’s printed on the screen.

The advantage of using it this way is that no content in the database is modified, and it’s easy to remove this feature when it’s not needed anymore. Feel free to add conditions depending on categories or other factors (you could check if the string “http” is present in the_content(), or only do this with .com endings, etc).

Learn more about this function here: https://codex.wordpress.org/Function_Reference/make_clickable

Creating a Podcast Feed with WordPress and PowerPress – Part 1

In this episode I’ll show you how to add podcasting capabilities to your WordPress website, using the Blubrry PowerPress plugin. I’ll explain the concepts and inner workings of a Podcast Feed, how it can be read by podcast directors and readers alike, and talk you through the installation of the plugin.

For this example, I will setup Category Podcasting on my website https://supersurvivor.tv, which will allow me to host more than one Podcast Feed from the site.

Catch this episode on my WP Guru Podcast:

Mozilla removed RSS Feed Reader Support in Firefox 64. Now what?

I only ever use Mozilla’s Firefox browser as an additional tool every once in a while. But when I do use it, I rely on features to work as they always have for me. Sometimes though, features that I rely on for testing are removed without advance notice (or perhaps I’m just not reading the right support forums). 

Which is why I was extremely sad to find out the hard way that RSS Feed Support was removed in Firefox 64, to which my browser upgraded itself today. Only the venerable Martin Brinkmann revealed this as far back as June, even though I only just found out about it today.

Rats, I thought. How am I going to test my Podcast Feeds? They’re all RSS based.

Turns out there are two solutions, one short term and one long term. In fact, there are probably a few others too, but sticking strictly with Firefox for now, here’s what can be done to display an RSS Feed in Firefox without additional tools.

Continue reading Mozilla removed RSS Feed Reader Support in Firefox 64. Now what?

How to submit your Podcast Feed to Spotify

In this episode I’ll show you how to add your Podcast Feed to Spotify. Until very recently, this was only possible if you were hosting your podcast with a specialist “aggregator service” (also known as podcast hosts), but Spotify have now enabled submissions from the likes of you and me as well. Here’s how to do it.

Catch this episode on my WP Guru Podcast: