Category Archives: Streaming

How to add custom emotes on Twitch

So I’ve made affiliate on Twitch last month (YEY!!!), and one of the perks is that I can upload my own custom emote. Which is super exciting! It takes a while for those little icons to get approved, but once they’re online they add a very personal touch to a stream.

My first iteration wasn’t great, so I took another crack at it and wanted to upload the new design – having forgotten where in the deep and dark Twitch interface that setting was. I thought I’d make a not for next time, and anyone struggling with the same thing.

We head over to our Twitch Dashboard (https://dashboard.twitch.tv), which is accessible from the front page from our icon at the top right, under Creator Dashboard.

At the top left corner there’s a menu, click that and navigate to Preferences – Affiliate.

Under the Subscriptions section, there’s an item called Emotes. That’s where we need to be.

You need to upload three sizes of your emote to make the little icon look handsome on all kinds of screen resolutions and circumstances:

  • 28×28
  • 56×56
  • 112×112

You also need to give it a unique name, made up of your channel name and a postfix of your choice. It’ll take some time for it get approved, and/or made live. Twitch will send you an email when you can use it.

Swapping emotes is possible, but it requires deleting and re-submitting them. Each subscription tier has one emote when you get started, but the more subscribers you get, the more “emote slots” you unlock. This handy article has all the juicy details:

Routing and monitoring Audio Sources in OBS

I’ve been struggling to route and monitor some of my audio sources in OBS. Thankfully I’ve found two essential tools that make this possible, and I thought I’d jot down some notes in case I forget.

I’ll also touch on how to monitor audio properly without causing an endless loop by recording what you’re monitoring.

The tools we need for ultimate success are:

In principle, we use the latter to route a source into the VB-Cable (a virtual destination), then we pick up the VB-Cable output as a separate input in OBS. We can then adjust its levels independently from other sources or apply filters if necessary. This all sounds more complex than it really is, so let me illustrate this with an example.

Installation Notes

VB-Cable installs like a regular app on Windows, and does not need to be started. It’s like a permanent audio device driver on your system. There are three versions in total: the free VB-Cable, as well as two donation ware items called VB-Cable A/B and C/D. We don’t need those, but if you ever require more than one routable audio destination, give them a try. Either one will get you two more destinations.

I took this screen grab so illustrate which download button to click for the regular VB-Cable:

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How to start a Rerun on Twitch (2020)

I’ve heard good things about Twitch Reruns, but had no idea how to get the going. I found the upload option, but I thought it would be ridiculous to download my own stream, then re-upload it for a Premiere. Turns out Reruns are a new panel you have to add to the re-designed Broadcast Dashboard.

Let me show you where to find it and how it works step by step (with screenshots, because I’ll probably forget a week from now).

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Flaky with a Capitol F: My Elgato HD 60 Pro review

I wanted a top quality capture solution for my PS3 and PS4 consoles, something that would last a few years and that I could use for high-quality HDMI capture of other devices too. I’ve had a cheap USB solution before and as you can imagine, the quality just wasn’t great. I finally bit the bullet and purchased an ELGATO HD60 Pro. This is a PCI-e card with a dedicated video encoder, HDMI in and out, and from what the sales brochure tells you, it’s the proverbial Dog’s Bollocks. I’ve had it for several months now and can give you some impressions.

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How the Playstation 4 dynamically regulates its streaming bitrate

I’ve been having some trouble with my internet connection lately. Up until two weeks ago I had an upload speed of about 20-25 Mbps, but since then it tanked down to an unstable and unpredictable 1-4 Mbps. I have my best technicians working on it (i.e. my internet provider). Needless to say, this put a damper on streaming at a constant bitrate of 5 Mbps like I usually do. I couldn’t even get OBS to deliver a stable 1Mbps connection.

My wife however was quite happily streaming FORTNITE directly from her PS4, and aside from a bit of blockiness every once in a while, the connection was stable for hours. I on the other hand couldn’t make anything work with OBS, no matter how hard I tried.

So what gives? There has to be some kind of magic in the way the Playstation consoles deal with streaming, on top of everything else. How come it works when OBS does not? I took a look at the data rate while I was test streaming, and found some interesting results.

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How to remove the Streamlabs Donation Link on YouTube

I’ve noticed that mildly annoying Streamlabs Donation link at the top of my YouTube descriptions. While I appreciate what they’re trying to do, I don’t use their service for live donations. Sometimes the page doesn’t work and it’s WAAAAY to complicated for casual users to figure out. So I’d rather this link wouldn’t be added automatically.

I did some digging and found the setting: it’s in your Streamlabs.com dashboard, under Donations – Donation Settings. There’s a section at the bottom that reads Your Page, with a tick box that’s enabled by default, called “make this visible in my description”.

If you have linked accounts, make sure you select YouTube from the top right first, otherwise this setting is missing (Mixer and Twitch don’t have this option).

This tip is courtesy of a Tweet from Streamlabs in answer to a question – thank you guys 🙂

How to export a Clip from Twitch to YouTube

There’s no direct way to export your Twitch Clips to YouTube, or download the material like we can do with Highlights or Past Broadcasts. However there is a way to turn any of your Twitch Clips into Highlights, and those can be downloaded or exported.

Let me show you how this works.

Head over to your channel, then select Clips at the top of the screen. You’ll see a whole page full of clips if you or other users have made any. Now select the big purple button that reads Manage Clips.

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How to access someone else’s Dashboard in Twitch

Twitch has an interesting feature that allows one user to manage a channel that isn’t theirs. It’s done using the Editor Role. It’s a tad complex to figure out where to do what, so I thought I’ll write it down before I forget.

I’m using the “old” in 2019 and have no idea where these settings are in the “up and coming” dashboard that’s gradually being rolled out. Figuring all these things out is a game in itself, isn’t it?

Before we get started, we need to grasp the concept. Let’s say you’re Channel A. If you want to manage another channel (say Channel B), then the owner of that channel needs to make you an editor. Once that’s happened, you can access a cut-down version of their dashboard and edit the stream title, game info and set markers. You can also create Highlights and things like that.

It does not automatically work the other way round, so if you want this relationship to be mutual, you’ll have to do this procedure twice. Here’s how to do it:

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How to remove chatters from your Twitch Stream

Every open platform attracts its trolls, and I’ve had my fair share of them. Since I stream to multiple platforms, I have to remember the “ban” commands for each one, as they work slightly differently. Perhaps that’s an idea for another article.

I’m used to dealing with Mixer’s /ban command, which immediately kicks a viewer out of the chat for good. I can reverse that decision in the web interface at a later time. Twitch also has a /ban command, but it does not remove the user in question from the chat, it merely hides their replies in my own feed.

To ban a Twitch user in the same way as we do on Mixer, we need to use the /block command. This is followed by just the user name without the @ sign, like this

To reverse this decision at a later time, we can use /unblock in the same way. So to bring SchlonzMeister back, we do this:

A less extrem option is the /ban command on Twitch. It does not remove users from the entire stream, instead it will hide their responses from your chat feed. You’ll still see an entry in that place, but it just says it’s a “hidden message”. Twitch calls such users “ignored users”. You can /unban people just the same.

Sadly though, Twitch does not currently have the ability to show a list of blocked or ignored users in one place, like Mixer or YouTube do. There is a third party open source tool that can display ignored (banned) users. I’ve not heard of such a tool for blocked users – if you know of one, please let me know.

Using Scene Collections in OBS Studio

A while ago I made a video about how to use OBS Studio for Screen Recordings. If you’re new to OBS, I recommend watching it to see how this thing works. I’ve been meaning to make an update to this and explain how to switch from one scene to another, but since it’s a complex process I decided to write this article instead. It might be easier to follow in words and screenshots.

Scenes are collections of items that appear on your (captured) screen. They allow you to craft something you’d like to show to your viewers, for example your desktop and an inset of your webcam. From time to time you may want to show something else, such as a video, or your web cam in full screen, or a zoomed-in portion of your desktop. That’s where scenes can be helpful, because each scene can show something different. You can then seamlessly switch between them with ease.

Let’s take a look at how we can make such magic happen.

This one’s for you, Rod!

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