Category Archives: Streaming

How to export a Clip from Twitch to YouTube

There’s no direct way to export your Twitch Clips to YouTube, or download the material like we can do with Highlights or Past Broadcasts. However there is a way to turn any of your Twitch Clips into Highlights, and those can be downloaded or exported.

Let me show you how this works.

Head over to your channel, then select Clips at the top of the screen. You’ll see a whole page full of clips if you or other users have made any. Now select the big purple button that reads Manage Clips.

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How to access someone else’s Dashboard in Twitch

Twitch has an interesting feature that allows one user to manage a channel that isn’t theirs. It’s done using the Editor Role. It’s a tad complex to figure out where to do what, so I thought I’ll write it down before I forget.

I’m using the “old” in 2019 and have no idea where these settings are in the “up and coming” dashboard that’s gradually being rolled out. Figuring all these things out is a game in itself, isn’t it?

Before we get started, we need to grasp the concept. Let’s say you’re Channel A. If you want to manage another channel (say Channel B), then the owner of that channel needs to make you an editor. Once that’s happened, you can access a cut-down version of their dashboard and edit the stream title, game info and set markers. You can also create Highlights and things like that.

It does not automatically work the other way round, so if you want this relationship to be mutual, you’ll have to do this procedure twice. Here’s how to do it:

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How to remove chatters from your Twitch Stream

Every open platform attracts its trolls, and I’ve had my fair share of them. Since I stream to multiple platforms, I have to remember the “ban” commands for each one, as they work slightly differently. Perhaps that’s an idea for another article.

I’m used to dealing with Mixer’s /ban command, which immediately kicks a viewer out of the chat for good. I can reverse that decision in the web interface at a later time. Twitch also has a /ban command, but it does not remove the user in question from the chat, it merely hides their replies in my own feed.

To ban a Twitch user in the same way as we do on Mixer, we need to use the /block command. This is followed by just the user name without the @ sign, like this

To reverse this decision at a later time, we can use /unblock in the same way. So to bring SchlonzMeister back, we do this:

A less extrem option is the /ban command on Twitch. It does not remove users from the entire stream, instead it will hide their responses from your chat feed. You’ll still see an entry in that place, but it just says it’s a “hidden message”. Twitch calls such users “ignored users”. You can /unban people just the same.

Sadly though, Twitch does not currently have the ability to show a list of blocked or ignored users in one place, like Mixer or YouTube do. There is a third party open source tool that can display ignored (banned) users. I’ve not heard of such a tool for blocked users – if you know of one, please let me know.

Using Scene Collections in OBS Studio

A while ago I made a video about how to use OBS Studio for Screen Recordings. If you’re new to OBS, I recommend watching it to see how this thing works. I’ve been meaning to make an update to this and explain how to switch from one scene to another, but since it’s a complex process I decided to write this article instead. It might be easier to follow in words and screenshots.

Scenes are collections of items that appear on your (captured) screen. They allow you to craft something you’d like to show to your viewers, for example your desktop and an inset of your webcam. From time to time you may want to show something else, such as a video, or your web cam in full screen, or a zoomed-in portion of your desktop. That’s where scenes can be helpful, because each scene can show something different. You can then seamlessly switch between them with ease.

Let’s take a look at how we can make such magic happen.

This one’s for you, Rod!

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List of randomly generated Mixer User Names

When users first sign up on Mixer.com, they’re assigned a totally random user name. It is anyone’s guess how these are generated, but it certainly adds a little mystery and machine-generated individuality to new users. Some of these names are quite funny, so I thought I’d compile a list of the ones we’ve come across.

I’ve removed the random number at the end, which leads me to believe it’s probably a finite list of names to which a unique identifier is added. If you’re interested to see what your random name was, it may still be part of your channel name.

Here’s what we’ve seen so far in 2019:

  • KuerbisGebhard
  • SidedMovie
  • LeftCarnival
  • RuggedWolf
  • RestoredHail
  • JuratoryCord
  • ChasedLeopard
  • SlowedZebra
  • ArielHealer
  • MissionTrack
  • SapphireGamer
  • CellularCorn
  • UselessList

The last one is my favourite! I’ve compiled instructions on how to change your user name here.

Have you come cross any other funny random combinations on Mixer? Leave them in the comment below for us all to enjoy 🙂