Tag Archives: Twitch

How to add custom emotes on Twitch

So I’ve made affiliate on Twitch last month (YEY!!!), and one of the perks is that I can upload my own custom emote. Which is super exciting! It takes a while for those little icons to get approved, but once they’re online they add a very personal touch to a stream.

My first iteration wasn’t great, so I took another crack at it and wanted to upload the new design – having forgotten where in the deep and dark Twitch interface that setting was. I thought I’d make a not for next time, and anyone struggling with the same thing.

We head over to our Twitch Dashboard (https://dashboard.twitch.tv), which is accessible from the front page from our icon at the top right, under Creator Dashboard.

At the top left corner there’s a menu, click that and navigate to Preferences – Affiliate.

Under the Subscriptions section, there’s an item called Emotes. That’s where we need to be.

You need to upload three sizes of your emote to make the little icon look handsome on all kinds of screen resolutions and circumstances:

  • 28×28
  • 56×56
  • 112×112

You also need to give it a unique name, made up of your channel name and a postfix of your choice. It’ll take some time for it get approved, and/or made live. Twitch will send you an email when you can use it.

Swapping emotes is possible, but it requires deleting and re-submitting them. Each subscription tier has one emote when you get started, but the more subscribers you get, the more “emote slots” you unlock. This handy article has all the juicy details:

How to add your Twitch URL to Reddit

I’ve been meaning to join Reddit about 20 years ago and never got round to it. Sadly my last name and site name are gone by now, but I finally managed to sign up – new for 2020 and all that. While I was there, I accidentally stumbled upon the option that lets you add your Twitch URL next to your user name. I had read how to do it recently, but it didn’t mean anything until I saw it.

Here’s how it works.

The option is not set on your user profile, but on the community, i.e. the Twitch Subreddit. You must join it first, head to its main page, then click the little pencil icon next to the option “Use Flair Preview”.

This will give you the option to edit your flair and show it on this community.

Hit apply and that’s it! Anytime you make a post or comment in the Twitch Subreddit, your link will be shown.

How to start a Rerun on Twitch (2020)

I’ve heard good things about Twitch Reruns, but had no idea how to get the going. I found the upload option, but I thought it would be ridiculous to download my own stream, then re-upload it for a Premiere. Turns out Reruns are a new panel you have to add to the re-designed Broadcast Dashboard.

Let me show you where to find it and how it works step by step (with screenshots, because I’ll probably forget a week from now).

Continue reading How to start a Rerun on Twitch (2020)

How to export a Clip from Twitch to YouTube

There’s no direct way to export your Twitch Clips to YouTube, or download the material like we can do with Highlights or Past Broadcasts. However there is a way to turn any of your Twitch Clips into Highlights, and those can be downloaded or exported.

Let me show you how this works.

Head over to your channel, then select Clips at the top of the screen. You’ll see a whole page full of clips if you or other users have made any. Now select the big purple button that reads Manage Clips.

Continue reading How to export a Clip from Twitch to YouTube

How to access someone else’s Dashboard in Twitch

Twitch has an interesting feature that allows one user to manage a channel that isn’t theirs. It’s done using the Editor Role. It’s a tad complex to figure out where to do what, so I thought I’ll write it down before I forget.

I’m using the “old” in 2019 and have no idea where these settings are in the “up and coming” dashboard that’s gradually being rolled out. Figuring all these things out is a game in itself, isn’t it?

Before we get started, we need to grasp the concept. Let’s say you’re Channel A. If you want to manage another channel (say Channel B), then the owner of that channel needs to make you an editor. Once that’s happened, you can access a cut-down version of their dashboard and edit the stream title, game info and set markers. You can also create Highlights and things like that.

It does not automatically work the other way round, so if you want this relationship to be mutual, you’ll have to do this procedure twice. Here’s how to do it:

Continue reading How to access someone else’s Dashboard in Twitch

How to remove chatters from your Twitch Stream

Every open platform attracts its trolls, and I’ve had my fair share of them. Since I stream to multiple platforms, I have to remember the “ban” commands for each one, as they work slightly differently. Perhaps that’s an idea for another article.

I’m used to dealing with Mixer’s /ban command, which immediately kicks a viewer out of the chat for good. I can reverse that decision in the web interface at a later time. Twitch also has a /ban command, but it does not remove the user in question from the chat, it merely hides their replies in my own feed.

To ban a Twitch user in the same way as we do on Mixer, we need to use the /block command. This is followed by just the user name without the @ sign, like this

To reverse this decision at a later time, we can use /unblock in the same way. So to bring SchlonzMeister back, we do this:

A less extrem option is the /ban command on Twitch. It does not remove users from the entire stream, instead it will hide their responses from your chat feed. You’ll still see an entry in that place, but it just says it’s a “hidden message”. Twitch calls such users “ignored users”. You can /unban people just the same.

Sadly though, Twitch does not currently have the ability to show a list of blocked or ignored users in one place, like Mixer or YouTube do. There is a third party open source tool that can display ignored (banned) users. I’ve not heard of such a tool for blocked users – if you know of one, please let me know.

How Quality Options work in YouTube, Twitch and Mixer streams

When we watch a video online, we usually get an option to pick a quality/resolution at the bottom right of the player. It’s often represented by a little gear icon that lets us choose either “auto” or a specific format like 480p or 720p.

But when we watch a live stream, those options might vary or be completely absent.

In this article I’ll discuss why that is and how different services deal with Quality Options in Live Streams.

Continue reading How Quality Options work in YouTube, Twitch and Mixer streams

How to find your Twitch Stream Key (2019)

The Twitch web interface changes what feels like every two months, which means I can never find my Twitch streaming key (granted, we only needed when setting up a new package). So for February 2019, here’s how to find it:

Login to Twitch.tv and head over to the top right corner and click on your User Name and Icon. Choose Dashboard.

On the right hand side, you’ll see a list of options. We’re looking for one called Channel, underneath the Settings Headline. It’s towards the bottom of the list.

Once selected, you’ll see a big box at the top reading Stream Key and Preferences. Your key is hidden by default, and you can either display it or copy it to your clipboard. You even have the option to reset it from here, should the need ever arise.

There. Quick and to the point. If this procedure ever changes, please let me know and I’ll update this article accordingly.

Happy streaming 🙂