Tag Archives: Firefox

How to switch from JFIF to JPEG on Drag-and-Drop in Windows 10

I’ve recently noticed that when I drag an image out of Firefox, it saves itself as a JFIF image on Windows 10. Choosing to save the same image via the right-click context menu will save it as JPEG image as expected.

This perplexed me, so I did some research and found a fix that would let me save images with a .jpg extension when dragged out of a web browser. I did this by associating the correct file format in Registry Editor.

Let me show you how it works in this article.

What is JFIF again?

JFIF is apparently the JPEG File Interchange Format. Apparently it’s been around since 1991, but I’ve only heard of it in the summer of 2019. It just goes to show that you always learn something new. This Wikipedia article has a little more information about the format.

As to why on earth Windows is setup for this by default, or why Firefox is saving images with this format when dragging them out into a folder, or since when images are in fact stored as this format is anybody’s guess.

How do we make this “normal” again?

In Windows 10, search for “reg” at the bottom left corner until you find the Registry Editor. Open it.

This is a slightly intimidating database tool that associates many Windows-internal values with its settings and behaviour towards other apps, but don’t be discouraged by that. At the top left corner you’ll find the following menu. Open the first item on this list, namely HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT. It’ll open an amazingly long list of scary things.

Of course there’s no way to search through these 900 million entries, that would be too easy. However, they’re alphabetically ordered, which does help us out a little bit. I guess this tool is not exactly designed to be used by humans. Scroll down to the MIME folder and open it.

We’ll find another folder called Database, under which there’s one called Content Type. Open the latter to find yet another long list of scary things. This one will list all so-called MIME Content Types, which lets Windows determine with what extension it should save a file of a particular type.

Find the entry for image/jpeg and take a look at its contents by clicking on it. Notice that – shockingly – the Extension field is set to .jfif. This would explain why Windows keeps saving JPEG files with the .jfif extension. Who authorised that?!

It stands to reason that if we simply change this value from .jfif to .jpg, all our dragged-out images would henceforth be saved as regular JPEG images. Let’s double-click the word Extension (under Name) and change .jfif to .jpg then press return. That’s all we need to do.

Your entry should look like this:

Now you may close the Registry Editor and drag as many JPEG images out of your browser as you like. No restart is necessary.

How to reactivate Easy YouTube Video Downloader for Firefox

There’s a really useful Firefox plugin called the Easy YouTube Video Downloader by Dishita. Here’s the direct link on the Firefox Add-Ons Directory. Once installed, it allows you to download MP4 and MP3 versions of any video on YouTube. That’s super handy if one my streams is not recorded properly at my end. Let me tell you, it’s always good to have a local backup of things!

With the free version we can download MP3 files in 128Kbps and MP4 files in 720p. Higher resolutions are available with the Pro Version, for which you can make a voluntary donation. It’ll work immediately after you’ve made a payment, by clicking a link provided to you via email.

Trouble is, every once in a while (usually after a Firefox update), the Pro Version reverts back to the Free Version, and you’re stuck without all your paid for Pro Features. How do we get them back without paying again?

I’ve just found out – and I thought I’d remind us all how this works.

Continue reading How to reactivate Easy YouTube Video Downloader for Firefox

How to install the British Spell Checker in Firefox

I admit my language needs are a little bit less “normal” than those of most people:

I live in the US, I write things in English most of my time, but I’m used to writing with British spelling and grammar – and occasionally I write in German too. So that makes managing languages on the myriad of devices I’m using sightly tricky.

In this article I’ll show you how to change your language settings in Firefox.

Continue reading How to install the British Spell Checker in Firefox

Mozilla removed RSS Feed Reader Support in Firefox 64. Now what?

I only ever use Mozilla’s Firefox browser as an additional tool every once in a while. But when I do use it, I rely on features to work as they always have for me. Sometimes though, features that I rely on for testing are removed without advance notice (or perhaps I’m just not reading the right support forums). 

Which is why I was extremely sad to find out the hard way that RSS Feed Support was removed in Firefox 64, to which my browser upgraded itself today. Only the venerable Martin Brinkmann revealed this as far back as June, even though I only just found out about it today.

Rats, I thought. How am I going to test my Podcast Feeds? They’re all RSS based.

Turns out there are two solutions, one short term and one long term. In fact, there are probably a few others too, but sticking strictly with Firefox for now, here’s what can be done to display an RSS Feed in Firefox without additional tools.

Continue reading Mozilla removed RSS Feed Reader Support in Firefox 64. Now what?

How to clear your Browser Cache

Apple SafariWeb Browsers like to save websites that you’ve visited earlier to speed up how quickly they can be displayed.

Everything that should be downloaded from the web is saved as local files (up to a point), and if a browser sees that you’re visiting site again that you’ve just been to, he serves the saved files rather than request them from the web again.

You can clear this cache and force the browser to load the results from the web. Eventually the cache clears itself, but it depends on “when the browser feels like it”.

Safari

If you’re using Safari, you can clear the cache by heading to Safari – Reset Safari. Tick “reset all website data” is usually enough, but you can clear several other things while you’re there too (like the history).

Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 17.33.20

Firefox

On Firefox this option is option is rather hidden under Firefox – Preferences – Advanced – Network, and under Cached Web Content there’s a button “clear now”. It’s always good to have a second browser installed just so you can check up on the other one (and trust neither).

Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 17.33.20

Alternatively, hold down CMD on Mac (or CTRL on Windows) and reload a page – this sometimes works on a “per page” basis, especially if you don’t trust what you’re seeing.

iOS also has this option under Settings – Safari – Clear History and Website Data.

Just something to keep in mind when you’re seeing unexpected results.

Thanks to Jerry and his new book for this article – I just explained this to him in an email and thought this would make an excellent blog post 😉