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  • Jay Versluis 5:54 pm on April 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Linux, Mac OS X, Windows ( 95 )

    What’s the difference between the Logitech M325 and the M325c 

    The Logitech M325 and M325c are both wireless USB mice. Their design appears to be identical (except for the various colourful variations of course), and their prices vary from anything between $12 and $60 – depending the layout and seller. Even the packaging is identical.

    So what’s the difference between these two models? Is it precision? Is it the build quality? Is it the year of production? Is it something else?

    Actually no, the two mice are absolutely identical and both work with Windows, macOS and Linux. The only difference is in the wireless receiver that Logitech give you with each model.

    The difference is the wireless receiver

    The M325 comes with a Logitech Unifying Receiver. You can tell by the little “sunshine” logo on the side. This type of receiver allows us to use the Logitech Unifying Software to operate several devices over a single receiver (say a mouse and a keyboard). It’s a little clunky to setup more than once device, but it certainly saves valuable USB slots on our machines.

    Note that for this to work, all decides must be Logitech unifying devices, and all must display that little sunshine logo.

    The M325c on the other hand does NOT come with a unifying receiver, and instead comes with a standard USB receiver. Only this one device will work with said receiver. As you can imagine, the receiver does not bear the unifying logo on the side. Therefore you may find the M325c a little cheaper than the M325.

    Note those that the M325c mouse itself IS a unifying device, and it DOES bear the unifying logo on the underside. Hence you can use the M325c mouse with another unifying receiver just fine.

    So there you have it – that’s the big secret difference between these two mice. I have both, and I couldn’t tell the difference at first. Just in case it too drives you crazy 🙂

     
    • me 6:32 pm on May 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      thank you for this simple and complete explanation

      • Jay Versluis 4:28 pm on May 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        You’re very welcome – it has been bugging me too 🙂

  • Jay Versluis 11:51 am on April 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Categories: Linux, Windows ( 95 )

    How to check which web server is running on a domain 

    Sometimes we must know what web server is running on a particular domain. Usually web hosts should be able to tell a client this, but if the client is afraid to ask, there is a way to ask the web server directly for this information.

    Just to clarify: the web server is the process that serves files (HTML, PHP, ASP, images, etc) from a remote machine to your local web browser. The most likely choices in this day and age (2017) are Apache, NGINX or IIS. The latter is used by Windows servers, and the two former are used by Linux servers. There are other web servers too, such as lighttpd, but they’re used less commonly.

    By asking the web server for this information, we can tell exactly who’s serving those files.

    How to ask the Web Server

    Let’s open a Terminal or Command Line Prompt window and utilise the good old fashioned Telnet protocol. Replace yourserver.com with the actual domain in question: (More …)

     
  • Jay Versluis 9:15 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply  
    Categories: Linux, Plesk ( 95 )

    How to reset the admin password in Plesk Onyx 

    It’s not pretty when it happens, but it happens to the best of us: you forget the admin password for your Plesk Onyx installation.

    In previous versions there was an option to retrieve this password via the command line, but that special command has been removed in Onyx for security reasons.

    So what can we do? Well luckily it’s relatively easy to reset the password to something else, or gain temporary access to the server quickly. Let me show you how. (More …)

     
  • Jay Versluis 8:33 am on January 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , WiFi   

    Categories: Windows ( 20 )

    How to fix “connected to WiFi, but can’t see the Internet” on Windows 10 

    For the last few days I had a very interesting (read: ultra annoying) issue with Windows 10 on my Surface Pro. No matter which network I was connecting to, I could never see the internet anymore.

    Logic dictates that there was perhaps an issue with the router, but since it happened on other networks as well, this couldn’t have been the case. I could even ping the router, but no matter what else I tried, Windows didn’t see the internet.

    Finally I came across this Microsoft Support Article that suggested several things, among whose suggestions were to reset the TCP/IP stack and to renew the IP address. Sounds like fun I thought and went to work.

    Here’s how I could solve my internet issues:

    (More …)

     
  • Jay Versluis 9:16 am on January 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Categories: Linux ( 95 )

    How to fix duplicate packages in yum 

    From time to time, the yum package manager may encounter issues with duplicate packages that are erroneously installed on a system. This manifests in a yum update going awry, telling us something along the lines of this:

    yum update
    ...
    --> Finished Dependency Resolution
    Error: Package: ntp-4.2.6p5-22.el7.centos.2.x86_64 (@updates)
               Requires: ntpdate = 4.2.6p5-22.el7.centos.2
               Removing: ntpdate-4.2.6p5-22.el7.centos.2.x86_64 (@updates)
                   ntpdate = 4.2.6p5-22.el7.centos.2
               Updated By: ntpdate-4.2.6p5-25.el7.centos.x86_64 (base)
                   ntpdate = 4.2.6p5-25.el7.centos
     You could try using --skip-broken to work around the problem
    ** Found 41 pre-existing rpmdb problem(s), 'yum check' output follows:
    // huge scary list of packages follows
    

    You may at times install all other packages via yum update –skip-broken, but it will still leave some trouble on the system. Best to take care of it.

    Here’s how I’ve managed to do it on many occasions:
    (More …)

     
  • Jay Versluis 6:33 pm on December 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Plesk Onyx   

    Categories: Plesk ( 70 )

    How to manage Git Repositories in Plesk Onyx 

    In this video I’ll show you how to manage Git repositories from Plesk Onyx, using the new Git Extension.

    We’ll setup a new repo in Plesk, check it out via the command line and make subsequent commits using the Github for Desktop client.

    Enjoy!

     
  • Jay Versluis 9:53 am on December 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Plesk, Screencast, WordPress ( 70 )

    How to install a free SSL Certificate in Plesk Onyx 

    In this video I’ll explain how to add a free SSL Certificate for web traffic in Plesk Onyx.

    First we’ll enable the Let’s Encrypt extension in Plesk, then we’ll create the certificate and prepare our subscription for SSL traffic. And finally, we’ll tweak two values in the WordPress database so that all requests will be directed to https rather than http.

    Note that Let’s Encrypt SSL Certificates can only be used to encrypt web traffic between your server and a client’s browser. They cannot currently be used to secure email or Plesk itself (but who knows what the future holds).

    Enjoy!

     
    • Brad M 1:44 pm on February 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you! Had a hiccup on the WP portion. Appreciate it 🙂

  • Jay Versluis 10:06 am on December 2, 2016 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Linux ( 95 )

    How to print the current date and time in BASH shell scripts 

    Sometimes it’s useful to print the current time and date in a BASH script. We can make use of the date command for that. By default, and if called without any parameters, it’ll print something like this:

    echo $(date)
    Tue 29 Nov 2016 23:08:10 EST

    We can shorten this to just the date by using a formatting shortcut like this:

    echo $(date +"%x")
    29/11/2016

    or just the time using this format:

    echo $(date +"%r")
    11:09:26 pm

    Formatting shortcuts can also be used together, like so:

    $(date +"%x %r")
    29/11/2016 11:03:44 pm

    For a complete list of shortcuts, try “man date” from the command line.

     
  • Jay Versluis 10:52 am on December 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Categories: Linux ( 95 )

    How to use functions in a BASH shell script 

    BASH can deal with simple functions, and they are defined like this:

    # this defines the function
    function testing {
        echo "Hi there!"
    }
    
    # this calls our function
    testing

    As far as I know, BASH functions cannot take or return parameters.

     
  • Jay Versluis 10:45 am on November 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply
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    Categories: Linux ( 95 )

    How to use variables in a BASH shell script 

    Here’s how to use simple variables in BASH shell scripts. It appears there are no data types, and everything’s a string (correct me if I’m wrong). We can define a variable by first setting it to a value, then later refer to that value with a dollar sign in front of the variable name.

    Here’s an example:

    #!/bin/bash
    
    VARIABLE="Testing"
    echo $VARIABLE

    Note that there are no spaces between the variable name, the equal sign or the value. Adding those will result in a runtime error.

    Variables can be defined in upper or lower case letters, or a combination thereof.

    BASH Variables have a global scope, unless they are prefaced with the local keyword inside functions (in which case, only said function will have access to its value).

     
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